Museums in Fox Point

Admission for Two or Four or a Family Membership to Jewish Museum Milwaukee (50% Off)

Jewish Museum Milwaukee

Milwaukee

Museum celebrates the history of Jewish people in Wisconsin through rotating engaging exhibits

$12 $6

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Admission or Membership to Charles Allis Art Museum or Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum (Up to 55% Off). Four Options Available.

harles Allis Art Museum and Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum

Multiple Locations

Explore 2000 years of history at Charles Allis Art Museum or decorative arts and Renaissance Garden at Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum

$60 $30

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Admission for Four Adults, or Membership for One Adult or Family at Elgin History Museum (Up to 51% Off)

Elgin History Museum

Eastside Elgin

Two floors of history exhibits reflecting Elgin’s rich past, including a collection of Elgin Watches and Elgin Road Race memorabilia

$12 $8

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Visit for Two or Four to Kohl Children's Museum (Up to 50% Off)

Kohl Children's Museum

Glenview

Two-acre outdoor sculpture park and 16 other interactive exhibits teach children how to build a house, harness natural power, and make art

$22 $14

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$12 for Visit for Two Adults and Two Kids and One $5 Gift Voucher to Klehm Arboretum ($23 Value)

Klehm Arboretum & Botanic Garden

Klehm Arboretum & Botanic Garden

Get access to the 155-acre living museum’s floral exhibits, forested paths, and children’s gardens, plus a gift-shop voucher

$23 $12

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Admission for Four to Madison Children's Museum (Up to 53% Off)

Madison Children's Museum

Capitol

Three-floor museum full of hands-on activities for kids 12 and under, including painting stations, giant Gerbil Wheel, and a rooftop garden

$31.80 $18

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Housemade Mustard or Guided Tour Including Personalized Mustard Case at National Mustard Museum (Up to 51% Off)

National Mustard Museum

Middleton

Browse the Great Wall of Mustard’s 5,600 jars, sample 500 flavors, and take home a case of mustard jars with your photo on them

$72 $35

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The Waukesha County Museum, which started in a basement room of the old courthouse in 1914, houses a more-than-2,000-square-foot repository for American history. The Memories of World War II touring exhibit pays homage to veterans, photographers, and reporters with more than 100 photos from Associated Press archives in addition to testimonies and hundreds of artifacts donated by local residents. Duck into the Greatest Generation Theater for a 20-minute film that illuminates the sagas of four local surviving WWII veterans.

101 W Main St
Waukesha,
WI
US

In 1928 the famous stage-acting couple Lynn Fontanne and Alfred Lunt declared that from then on they would only appear onstage together. They also refused to act during the summer so they could spend the season at Ten Chimneys—their 60-acre estate retreat in the rolling hills of Kettle Moraine. Alfred had begun the construction himself in 1914, designing the first part of the three-story main house. In 1922 he and Lynn, newly married, began making additions: they converted the house's chicken coop into a private five-room country cottage and built a Swedish-style log cabin for use as a performance studio. Here, they lived and entertained a revolving cast of actors, writers, and artists until their retirement in 1960.

Today, trained docents lead small groups on tours through the cottage, the studio, and the main house's 18 rooms. Some of these confines bear unique titles such as the Flirtation Room, whereas others are named for past guests Helen Hayes, Laurence Olivier, and Noël Coward. Guides divulge the history behind many of the eclectic artifacts found there, such as Staffordshire figurines, pre-Civil War oil lamps, and Delft china, and reveal details about more personal pieces such as handmade gifts from Helen Hayes and Noël Coward, photographs with Charlie Chaplin, and murals painted by set designer Claggett Wilson. Outside, they lead visitors past a creamery and greenhouse, and point out a copper mermaid—designed and crafted by Cecil Beaton—that sits atop the estate's pool house to scare away sailors.

Throughout the year, Ten Chimneys hosts special theater-centric events. Play readings held in partnership with the Milwaukee Repertory Theater showcase the theater's interns as they read works connected to the Lunts or guests at their estate. During Music in the Drawing Room, cabaret artists from around the country gather around Noël Coward's historic piano to perform for small crowds and confuse unprepared time travelers. The estate also invites well-known local or national theater practitioners for a guest-speaker series inspired by the theater-minded talks that took place at the Lunts’ dining table.

S43 W31575 Depot Road
Genesee Depot,
WI
US

Completed in 1892 as the private home of the Pabst family, Pabst Mansion stands as the last bastion of more than 80 mansions built for Milwaukee’s elite during a booming, bygone era. Since its construction, the estate has housed archbishops, priests, and sisters and was saved from near-demolition during the 1970s. The Flemish-Renaissance-Revival home has since been awarded a place on the National Register of Historic Places for its bounty of architectural intricacies.

Today, on-staff docents conduct a range of tours for public groups, private parties, school groups, and well-behaved rugby teams through the fortress of halls, opulent rooms, and verdant grounds, each restored to their original condition.

The Pabst Mansion’s impressive art collection includes works from the 1640s through the 1900s by artists such as William-Adolphe Bouguereau, Gaetano Trentanove, and Eugene Joseph Verboeckhoven. The emporium of excess also features Pabst Beer Pavilion, the pavilion built for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, and the glass-covered conservatory where tropical plants and beer trees continue to flourish.

The mansion gift shop holds classic Pabst drinkware and memorabilia as well as antique photos, books, and former employees' original finger paintings.

2000 W Wisconsin Ave
Milwaukee,
WI
US

The Chudnow Museum of Yesteryear showcases the personal collection of Avrum Chudnow, who willed that his extensive array of early 20th century American paraphernalia be put on display for all to see.The museum sorts the collection by function, recreating shops, homes, and workspaces as they might have appeared in the 1920's or 1930's. Permanent displays include the H. Grafman Grocery Store?a recreation of a local, immigrant-run grocery store?and a speakeasy, accessible only through a hidden passage in one of the shops.

The museum also houses the Dr. Eisenberg Clinic, a staging of a chapter in the museum building's own history. The historical edifice was once the real office of the doctor, who practiced family medicine and enjoyed keeping his stuff in glass cases in the 1920's.

839 North 11th Street
Milwaukee,
WI
US

The 14,000-year-old Hebior mammoth stands sentinel past the entrance to the Milwaukee Public Museum, serving as a massive reminder to all who enter that they are traveling back in time. Originally founded in 1882, the museum has spent more than a century collecting artifacts and fossils from around the world to portray the vast reaches of natural and human history throughout 150,000 square feet of exhibit space spread over three and a half floors.

Representing the recent past, The Streets of Old Milwaukee's turn-of-the-century gas-lit lanes and the European Village place visitors up close to replicas of more than 58 structures, including an old-fashioned barbershop and a fully furnished Scottish dwelling. Traveling further back to the Cretaceous period in the Third Planet exhibit, a life-size replica of a tyrannosaurus greets visitors with its tiny arms and impeccable manners. Visitors can also explore treasures from Africa, Asia, and the Arctic, or stroll through the butterfly wing to witness free-flying exotic and native species.

Adjacent to the museum, the Daniel M. Soref Planetarium and IMAX theater display astronomical wonders with a Digistar 3 computer-projection system. The Skies Over Milwaukee show lights up the ceiling with the current night sky for a tour of the planets and constellations. In the same theater, IMAX films transport audience members to the top of Everest or to the bottom of the ocean with a six-story screen, wraparound digital sound, and the distilled imaginations of 5-year-olds.

800 W Wells St
Milwaukee,
WI
US

The 14,500-year-old Hebior mammoth stands sentinel at the entrance to the Milwaukee Public Museum, serving as a massive reminder to all who pass that they are traveling back in time. Originally founded in 1882, the museum has spent more than a century collecting artifacts and fossils from around the world to portray the vast reaches of natural and human history throughout 150,000 square feet of exhibit space spread over three and a half floors.

Representing the recent past, The Streets of Old Milwaukee's turn-of-the-century gas-lit lanes and the European Village place visitors up close to replicas of more than 58 structures, including an old-fashioned barbershop and a fully furnished Scottish dwelling. Traveling further back to the Cretaceous period in the Third Planet exhibit, a life-size replica of a tyrannosaurus greets visitors with its tiny arms and impeccable manners. Visitors can also explore treasures from Africa, Asia, and the Arctic, or stroll through the butterfly wing to witness free-flying exotic and native species.

Adjacent to the museum, the Daniel M. Soref National Geographic Dome Theater and Planetarium theater display astronomical wonders with a Digistar 3 computer-projection system. The Skies Over Milwaukee show lights up the ceiling with the current night sky for a tour of the planets and constellations. In the same theater, giant screen films transport audience members to the top of Everest or to the bottom of the ocean with a six-story screen, wraparound digital sound, and the distilled imaginations of 5-year-olds.

800 W Wells St
Milwaukee,
WI
US