Breweries in Weehawken


Select Local Merchants

The team at Bronx Brewery is determined?maybe to the point of obsession?to brew the best pale ales on the East Coast. Eschewing whimsical names and other gimmicks, the brewers' no-nonsense approach produces year-round beers, seasonal selections, and even limited batches that are aged in oak wine and spirit barrels. Fans can get a sneak peak into the brewery's processes during tours throughout the week, which explain the facility's equipment and processes. Before and after tours, groups can relax in the tasting room while playing board games or foosball, drinking fresh brews, and snacking on food from the tasting room or ordered in from one of the delivery menus available.
856 East 136th Street
Bronx,
NY
US
As one of the last Colonial buildings remaining in New York, Fraunces Tavern gives patrons a sense of what life was like nearly a century before America’s nationhood. Built in 1719 as a merchant's residence, the building was purchased by tavern keeper Samuel Fraunces in 1762. It soon became a hotbed of pre- and post-Revolution activity. This includes a visit from George Washington in 1783, during which he stood in The Long Room and delivered a farewell address to officers of the Continental Army. Today, Fraunces Tavern functions as both a museum and a restaurant operated by Dublin-based The Porterhouse Brewing Co. Preserved to retain its original Colonial appearance, the dining room is defined by its plank floors, stalwart wood tables, and bench seating. At the bar, brass dispensers pour microbrews such as the Plain Porter, which has won multiple distinctions from The Brewing Industry International Awards. The Dingle Whiskey Bar, a secluded part of the tavern, invites whiskey aficionados to lay down their muskets, take off their tricorn hats, and relax in front of a crackling fire.
54 Pearl Street
New York,
NY
US
At Heartland Brewery Chophouse, you can build-your-own burger in a laid-back setting. No need to miss out on Heartland Brewery Chophouse just because you are avoiding fat or gluten. The burger joint has tons of options that can accommodate your dietary needs. Pair your entree with a glass of wine or draft beer — Heartland Brewery Chophouse has a fully-stocked bar to complement your meal. Eat out with the little ones at Heartland Brewery Chophouse, and don't waste time scurrying for a sitter. Have a big celebration coming up? Consider the private room at Heartland Brewery Chophouse, perfect for large groups of revelers. Unwind on a budget, and enjoy happy hour's low-cost beers and simple eats. Weeknights are busy for Heartland Brewery Chophouse, so call ahead and make a reservation if you can. Heartland Brewery Chophouse welcomes laid-back diners, so there's no pressure to throw on heels or a tie. The burger joint has catering services as well. Or, take your grub to-go. For those who can't find a spot on the street, Heartland Brewery Chophouse provides access to a nearby garage. If you feel like saving gas, opt for public transportation, with stops conveniently located at Times Sq - 42 St. (S), 42 St. - Bryant Pk (B, D, F, M), and Times Sq - 42 St. (1, 2, 3, N, Q, R). A mid-priced establishment, Heartland Brewery Chophouse offers meals that typically cost about $30 or less.
127 W 43rd St
New York,
NY
US
In 1854, just three years after he landed in New York, Irishman John McSorley opened a blue-collar saloon that served ale along with cheese and crackers. He probably never foresaw the legends who would walk through the swinging front doors, or that his saloon would become a landmark associated with literature, art, music, and even civil rights. In the more than 150-year history of McSorley’s Old Ale House, its sawdust-strewn floors were tread on by figures such as Abraham Lincoln, John Lennon, and Woody Guthrie. e.e. cummings visited and wrote the poem “i was sitting in mcsorley’s”, and artist John French Sloan created several paintings depicting the saloon. Even a play inspired by McSorley’s ran on Broadway for more than 100 performances. Two attorneys led a suit to allow women into the ale house, taking the case all the way to the Supreme Court. And amid this flurry of activity, the saloon survived multiple changes to the brewer of its McSorley’s Cream Stock Ale, including during Prohibition when Bill McSorley had to set up a brewery in the basement. Though ownership has changed three times, each owner has honored the original spirit of McSorley’s. This remains true today as the Maher family continues to run the place as a true ale house. Behind the bar still looms the words of John McSorley embossed on a hardwood cabinet: “Be good or be gone.”
15 East 7th Street
New York,
NY
US
Pino Pizza serves up hot and delicious pizza in a casual dining environment. Gluten-free and low-fat eaters will enjoy the menu at Pino Pizza. Unwind with a glass of wine or cocktail with your meal — Pino Pizza has a wonderful selection of drinks to accompany your dinner. The perfect place to take the kids, dining out at Pino Pizza won't cost you a sitter. Pino Pizza offers a free wifi hot spot — perfect for surfing the web or getting a little work done. Large groups will appreciate Pino Pizza for its ability to seat them quickly. Reservations are offered, so call ahead to lock down your table. Need a night in? Don't miss out on Pino Pizza's delicious food — you can carry it out to eat at home or have them deliver it straight to you. Pino Pizza will even bring the amazing food from their kitchen to yours. Pino Pizza makes bikers feel at ease with the multiple storage racks outside. The grub at Pino Pizza is also a downright bargain — most people can chow down for less than $15. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner are all available at Pino Pizza.
2510 Carson St
Lakewood,
CA
US
The Ginger Man might be relatively quiet by day, but come evening, this Midtown restaurant and bar features an international selection of beers that keeps customers hopping. Happy hour officially kicks off the festivities, while crowds continue to swell as the evening progresses. International vintage beer and alcohol advertisements line the walls inside the Ginger Man, where groups of beer lovers enjoy selections ranging from an Emelesse Smoked Porter from the Netherlands to a bottle of Japanese Hitachino Red Rice. Beers come from halfway across the world or just down the road, including a local cask-conditioned pale ale from a Bronx brewery. Pretzels, sandwiches, sausage and cheese plates, as well as an array of meat pies make for good pub fare to wash down all the suds, wine and spirits. Sink into a tall wooden booth or hang by the large front windows for a more loungey feel.
11 East 36th Street
New York,
NY
US
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