Jazz Clubs in Weehawken

Select Local Merchants

Brasserie Julien’s chefs pamper palates with gourmet French specialties, sea delicacies, and expertly crafted signature drinks in a romantic setting. New York magazine writes that “it’s impossible to dine at this Upper East side brasserie and not think of Paris.” Upscale small plates whet appetites and facilitate the enjoyment of French aperitifs, with selections such as 24 plain oysters or shells stuffed with misplaced pirate-chest keys. Endive salads, quiche lorraine, or an assortment of soups sate cravings for light fare, and steak, fondue, or filet mignon quell ampler appetites. During wine tours, accomplished sommelier Mollie Battenhouse regales guests with about 10 samples of varietals from around the globe, as well as portions of the eatery’s brasserie fare.

Inside Brasserie Julien’s romantic and relaxed dining room, art-deco-inspired pendant lights illuminate the space's elegant columns, flowing curtains, and trumpet-playing silverware to create an authentic brasserie-style experience.

1422 3rd Ave
New York,
NY
US

Open since 2009, Tutuma Social Club is one of the first Afro-Peruvian jazz venues in the city. Helmed by owner Santina Matwey, the club mimics those found in Lima, combining a party atmosphere with contemporary Peruvian cuisine. Peru's international chefs, Carlos Testino and Rodrigo Conroy, craft a dinner menu of ceviche and seafood dishes made with ingredients native to South America.

As diners spoil taste buds with flavors from Peru, ear-tongues can savor live music from Gabriel Alegria Afro-Peruvian Sextet or from national touring artists, whose schedules can be found on the club's event calendar. Long tables line the white walls of the venue, ending with a small stage pronounced by an eye-popping red wall.

164 E 56th St
New York,
NY
US

With one look at Oro di Oliva's selection of oils and vinegars, it's evident that they know that good food comes from high-quality ingredients. All of Oro di Oliva's oils and vinegars, which hail from across the globe, are bottled upon order to preserve their flavors. Their extensive selection comprises 11 types of extra virgin olive oils from locales including Chile and Sicily. For an added taste bud kick, they press some of the oils with ingredients such as whole fruit, garlic, persian lime, jalapeno, and basil for flavored variants. Their 16 balsamic vinegars are made from grapes and blended with black cherries, pomegranate, and Vermont maple. White balsamic vinegars bear flavors including honey ginger, white peach, and alfoos mango souls. In addition to oil and vinegar sampler packs, the shop stocks goods including cork spouts and black truffled sea salt to complement bottles.

161 E Houston St
New York,
NY
US

The stage at Garage Restaurant & Cafe has hosted the saxophone-shredding, piano-pounding, guitar-plucking performances of more than 55 rotating jazz performers. These live acts range from solo artists to sextets and from crooners to percussionists, each of whom is versed in a range of jazz styles. As their musical stylings wash over the Greenwich Village eatery and its sidewalk patio during brunch and late-night dinners, Garage's chefs turn out gourmet dishes. Roquefort cheese-topped filet mignon, sauteed cakes of Maryland crab and Maine lobster, and flame-grilled cornish game hen keep audiences fueled for late-night listening or long, drawn out conversations in which they say nothing but "daddy-o." A raw bar, meanwhile, showcases selections of oysters and clams.

Knowing that classic cocktails and jazz go hand-in-hand, Garage's bartenders shake and stir more than 20 eclectic martinis. They can also pour from a collection of more than 80 international wines.

99 7th Ave S
New York,
NY
US

On any given night, a guest at Blue Note might be pulled onstage to sit in on a jazz standard. This would merely qualify as another of the club’s charming eccentricities, were that guest not typically someone like Stevie Wonder, Liza Minnelli, or Quincy Jones. New York’s musical royalty frequents Blue Note to hear original, historical jazz, as well as the innovative genres that the club passionately supports. They look on approvingly as the rising stars of the soul, hip hop, funk, and pantomime scenes blaze sonic trails between the stage’s parted blue curtains. These performers fill the atmosphere with smooth sounds on most nights of the week, and their exquisite talents are matched by a menu of pan-roasted salmon, marinated skirt steak, and grilled baby-back ribs.

131 West 3rd Street
New York,
NY
US

In December 1949, just as Manhattan was entering the height of its jazz craze, an alto saxophonist by the name of Charlie “Bird” Parker stepped onstage at Birdland for the venue’s inaugural headlining gig. The guests who packed the club that night paid $1.50 each to see the jazz legend perform, and few could have foreseen the heights his reputation would one day reach. More than six decades later, jazz enthusiasts continue to stream into Birdland, trusting the club’s pedigree as a hotspot for up-and-coming artists. Parker may have hung up his sax long ago, but performers such as Oscar Peterson, Hank Jones, and Dave Brubeck carry on his legacy. While the ghost of “Bird” flits through the air, guests order from a menu of American cuisine enlivened with Cajun spices.

315 West 44th Street
New York,
NY
US