Clubs in Wells Branch

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Though cigars were originally invented to celebrate the invention of the cigar, it can be used today to celebrate any occasion, up to and including "being alive and enjoying a fine cigar." For $10, today’s side deal gets you $20 worth of cigars from around the world at Fumée Cigar Lounge in Cedar Park. You may also use your Groupon in Fumée’s café. Menu items include cappuccino ($3), hookah ($10/hour), or if you just need a mixer to wet your smoky throat, Italian soda or Red Bull ($3). Fumée is open seven days a week.

2403 S Bell Blvd
Cedar Park,
TX
US

Founded by a posse of Kentucky-area natives, Trifecta On 3rd distinguishes itself with an enormous bourbon selection and a gourmet bar menu heavy on specialty pizzas. These house pies include the Southwestern chorizo, made with fresh, golden corn and cilantro, and the Fireball, which scalds mouths with jalapeños, serranos, habaneros, and, when in season, the notoriously nuclear Ghost Chili. Between bites, patrons can escape to Trifecta's expansive patio lest their ear-steam obstruct others' view of the interior's seven flat-screen TVs.

360 Nueces St, Ste 30
Austin,
TX
US

801 W 5th St
Austin,
TX
US

White rice and bright slices of vegetables add a colorful counterpoint to the traditional dishes served at Yazmyne'z Restaurant and Mediterranean Cuisine. Delicately spiced pieces of kofta get wrapped in pita sandwiches and savory slices of gyros meat get scattered alongside pepperoni and vegetables atop crispy pizzas. Patrons can inhale sweet puffs of smoke from hookahs packed with specialty flavor combinations, such as peach and mint, melon and kiwi, or Earth, Wind, and Fire.

1100 Grand Avenue Parkway
Pflugerville,
TX
US

Kenneth Threadgill stood in line all night to be the first person in Travis County to get a beer license. It was 1933, and the bootlegger and country-music connoisseur had plans to evolve his filling station into something bigger—though even Threadgill probably couldn't have anticipated how big it would become.

It started with touring musicians stopping in for drinks after their shows. By the ’60s, Janis Joplin was on stage, polishing her unpolished sound for crowds from all walks of life. The evolution continued, with Threadgill's hosting artists from Jerry Lee Lewis to Captain Beefheart and expanding into a Southern-style restaurant where the love of music ironed out disagreements and engendered an atmosphere of tolerance.

Today, the original location on North Lamar harks back to Threadgill's beginnings, with current owner Eddie Wilson decking the place out with decor that evokes the Austin of the 1930s to the 1960s, including vintage signs that say, “I can’t wait for the internet to be invented.” The second location on West Riverside celebrates the 1970s music scene that thrived at the Armadillo—Wilson's former establishment at that location. At both venues, chefs churn out classic Southern food, such as chicken-fried steak and fried green tomatoes, while frequent live music entertains guests.

301 W Riverside Dr
Austin,
TX
US

Designed by legendary movie-house architect John Eberson and opened to the public as a vaudeville palace in 1915, the venue enjoyed performances by the likes of Harry Blackstone and Katharine Hepburn in its heyday. But things fell into decline during the 1960s as televisions became commonplace, more people migrated to the suburbs, and the stage’s trapdoor spontaneously grew fangs. The Paramount’s multi-tiered seating and historic ceiling murals languished in the theater’s years to follow as a tragically underused B-movie cinema.

In 1973, three men—John M. Bernardoni, Charles Eckerman, and Stephen L. Scott—formed a corporation with the ultimate goal of rescuing the Paramount, by that time slated for destruction. Soon, live performers were regularly supplementing a classed-up movie schedule, and the stage was graced by such artists as Dave Brubeck and Debbie Allen. The theater’s star rose ever higher in the ‘80s and ‘90s as the curtains introduced the world to such lasting works as The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas and the Greater Tuna series. Today, the lovingly built and rebuilt artifact is a constant reminder of Austin’s long history of arts appreciation.

713 Congress Ave
Austin,
TX
US