Kids Activities in West Hartford

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The New Children’s Museum's hands-on exhibits challenge kids to think creatively and solve problems. They can observe lizards in mock habitats, build Lego towers and put them to the test against simulated earthquakes, follow a timeline of Mars' history, and learn about the Earth's rotation under a Foucault pendulum. The museum also hosts camps and birthday parties, helping to make learning become a celebrated part of life.

950 Trout Brook Drive
West Hartford,
CT
US

Since 1907, Flamig Farm has developed into a reputable educational-resource facility complete with an extensive petting zoo. Visitors can frolic with emus, ducks, and sheep, then cuddle with bunnies and piglets. Though not included in this Groupon, the farm offers several other activities, including pony rides, hikes, and hayrides. The farm closes when the weather gets cold, so be sure to visit before animals migrate to Hollywood and resume their winter jobs as fast-food commercial spokesmen.

7 Shingle Mill Rd
West Simsbury,
CT
US

The 18-hole course at Simsbury Farms sprawls across 235 acres of countryside that was apple orchards before the course's unveiling in 1972. The 6,509-yarder demands accuracy and consistency off the tee, creating headaches for players who can't keep drives in the fairway on the uphill No. 2, the pond-hopping No. 2, and the dogleg-left No. 18, where the final flagstick must be captured. Its abundance of tough—but fair—challenges have earned the course the right to host tournaments such as the Connecticut State Women’s Amateur Championship and Senior Open, while its commitment to environmental conservancy has earned it a spot on the list of courses recognized by Audubon International.

Course at a Glance:

  • 18-hole, par 72 course
  • Length of 6,509 yards from the farthest tees
  • Course rating of 71.2 from the farthest tees
  • Slope rating of 129 from the farthest tees
  • Four tee options
  • Scorecard
100 Old Farms Rd
West Simsbury,
CT
US

Entering their 85th season, the Harlem Globetrotters have entertained millions of parents, children, and general basketball admirers with a unique brand of athletic precision and showmanship. For their latest “4 Times the Fun” North American tour, the Globetrotters will add a new 4-point shot spots located 35 feet from the basket, which is 12 feet further than the official three-point line but several thousand miles closer than the prime meridian. See the arch-nemesis Generals try to keep up as the Harlem hardwood sorcerers evade gravity’s oppressive clutches and court clairvoyants distribute unassailable alley-oops. Youngsters can learn about the benefits of teamwork while laughing along with the jovial jocks as they perform classic routines of unconventional passing and sudden transmutations of water into confetti.

1 Civic Center Plz
Hartford,
CT
US

Samuel Clemens lived a life so full that it encompassed two names. He was a riverboat pilot, a silver prospector, and a newspaperman—and it was in this last trade that he first used the name under which he would author some of America's greatest fiction: Mark Twain. In works such as Adventures of Tom Sawyer and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court­ Twain cast a wry spotlight on the political and industrial changes of the 19th century, from westward expansion to the end of slavery to the birth of ground-breaking technology such as the mustache comb. In much the same way, the very space where Twain wrote—the Hartford home where his family lived from 1874 to 1891—illuminates the times as well as the personal life of the man behind the letters.

These days, that home is a National Historic Landmark that serves as half of The Mark Twain House and Museum. Comprised of 25 rooms, including a glass conservatory and grand library, it has been open to the public since its 100th anniversary in 1974. Inside, visitors explore not only the billiard room where Twain penned novels such as Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, but also nearly 16,000 Twain-related artifacts, such as his last pair of spectacles and photos of his daughters putting on plays. Even more objects and information fill the nearby LEED-certified museum, where rotating exhibits focus on subjects such as the Twain family's servants.

65 Forest St
Hartford,
CT
US

"Her words changed the world," reads the website for the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center. "What will you do?" As the author of the 1852 novel Uncle Tom's Cabin, Stowe's moving prose helped expose the brutal reality of slavery in the United States. Today, her family home still stands in honor of her memory, welcoming guests as a museum and historic site.

Visitors step into the past via the front door, stopping by the front parlor to see where the Stowes gathered to take tea, play games, and debate the pressing issues of the day. The ground floor also houses some of the Stowes' original furnishings, including a dining room table and Harriet's own oil and watercolor paintings. The second floor offers a more personal look at the author's day-to-day life through touches such as her hand-painted furniture, as well as a terrarium that reflected her love of nature. Guided tours can provide further insight into the life of a woman who, in a time period marked by prejudice and turmoil, nevertheless spoke in favor of equality and change.

77 Forest St
Hartford,
CT
US