Brazilian Restaurants in West Springfield

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Chef Alcy De Souza named his restaurant after the Grammy Award-winning song that, in his words, “evokes beauty, elegance, and a dream.” At Grill from Ipanema, Chef Alcy is living his dream, which grew out a childhood spent helping his mother prepare meals for their family in Brazil. He wanted to bring the flavors of Brazil to the US and open a contemporary restaurant that stayed true to the history of Brazilian cuisine, which has roots in the indigenous people as well as immigrants from Africa, Europe and Asia. So for the past 20 years, he and his team have been serving authentic dishes from various regions of Brazil to hungry diners in the Adam’s Morgan neighborhood. Classic entrees include the Brazilian national dish, feijoada, a rich stew of black beans, dry beef, pork, sausage, and smoked meat served with collard greens and rice, as well as moqueca a baiana, a palm oil and coconut milk stew with cilantro, tomato, onion, scallions, green pepper, and a choice of fish. The drink menu also features authentic Brazilian creations, such as fruity cachacas and caipirinhas, as well as Brazilian beers and a soda featuring guarana berries, a fruit found only in the Amazon.

1858 Columbia Rd NW
Washington,
DC
US

Specializing in teppanyaki, Samurai?s chefs grill fresh scallops, strip steaks, and salmon at cooktops built into the tabletops of their Japanese-style dining room. This tableside preparation ensures that every hibachi entree is delivered with their just-seared flavors intact, while maki filled with yellowtail, avocado, or eel are rolled behind the scenes and presented on combination platters.

10645-B Braddock Rd.
Fairfax,
VA
US

An evening at Tokyo Japanese Steak House generally includes dinner and a show, but it’s not live music or dancing, and each group of diners gets their own performance. Guests sit down at U-shaped tables built around grills, where chefs theatrically slice, toss, and sizzle teppanyaki dishes. Guests can choose a single protein or a combination—including filet mignon and shrimp—which are seared amid plumes of steam and fire before their very eyes. More mellow meals take place at the sushi and noodle bar, where patrons look on as chefs meticulously build smoked salmon nigiri and Japanese lasagna, a baked California roll with secret sauce.

The dishes pair perfectly with their slew of Asian-inspired drinks. In addition to pouring sake and Sapporo, the bartenders mix specialty cocktails, such as the Tokyo sunrise with tequila, plum wine, and pineapple juice.

66 Canal Center Plz
Alexandria,
VA
US

Originally built in the 1800s as a hog and dairy farm, the historical Russell House was made over in 1997 as the site of Daks Grill. The flagstone-covered restaurant welcomes guests seven days a week, serving up fresh soups and grilling USDA Choice steaks, such as the 14-ounce new york strip and tender 8-ounce seasoned filet mignon. During the warmer months, diners can enjoy their food on the spacious outdoor patio while keeping an eye on suspiciously bunny-like cloud formations.

13641 Minnieville Rd
Woodbridge,
VA
US

An evening at Tokyo Japanese Steak House generally includes dinner and a show, but it’s not live music or dancing, and each group of diners gets their own performance. Guests sit down at U-shaped tables built around grills, where chefs theatrically slice, toss, and sizzle teppanyaki dishes. Guests can choose a single protein or a combination—including filet mignon and shrimp—which are seared amid plumes of steam and fire before their very eyes. More mellow meals take place at the sushi and noodle bar, where patrons look on as chefs meticulously build smoked salmon nigiri and Japanese lasagna, a baked California roll with secret sauce. The dishes pair perfectly with their slew of Asian-inspired drinks. In addition to pouring sake and Sapporo, the bartenders mix specialty cocktails, such as the Tokyo sunrise with tequila, plum wine, and pineapple juice.

2705 Metro Plz
Woodbridge,
VA
US

Franklin D. Roosevelt, Amelia Earhart, Robert Frost, and Calvin Coolidge were some of the first inhabitants of the walls of Occidental Grill & Seafood, where their autographed photos have since been joined by more than 1,500 statesmen, power brokers, and celebrities. Throughout the restaurant’s nearly 110 years in business, its various menus have served as a mirror to the major events of the 20th century, from the conserved portions that addressed the food shortage during World War I to the 1924 victory banquet for the World Series–winning Washington Senators. Today, following a massive renovation in its 100th year, executive chef Rodney Scruggs achieves the difficult task of paying homage to the past in forward-thinking dishes. Scruggs himself boasts quite the history in the culinary realm. His first job after studying culinary arts at Newbury College was—perhaps not so coincidentally—the Occidental, where he worked his way from a line cook to an executive sous chef. His career led him through some of the area’s most notable eateries before he returned to the Occidental, where he furthers simple combinations of fresh, local ingredients with refined touches and careful preparation. To wit, crispy soft-shell crab is accompanied by a sweat-pea puree, and roasted virginia rack of lamb hails from Border Springs Farm and sits beneath a coating of demi-glace. In addition to American craft beers and wines from around the globe, diners can honor the eatery’s legacy by sipping classic cocktails such as a rickey from Washington circa 1883 and a sidecar from 1920’s London. Surrounded by the aforementioned autographed photos, the main dining room exudes old-school elegance. From high, recessed ceilings, ornate bowl-shaped chandeliers dangle over white tablecloths in front of burgundy leather booths and windsor chairs. The wine room has a slightly darker décor, as the wine bottles lining the walls reflect the rich-chocolate color of high-backed leather chairs.

1475 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US