Seafood Restaurants in West University Place

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The original Ragin Cajun joint opened in 1974, treating visitors to hearty po' boys, spicy red beans and rice, and authentic boiled crawfish. Today, visitors make the pilgrimage to one of five area locations, including the Woodlands location, newly-opened in 2014, plopping down at tables clad in red-checker cloth to sup on meals of Gulf shrimp and crab, grilled rib eye, and homemade bread pudding. The intense flavors and ocean-fresh cuisine of southwestern Louisiana unfold in a dining room decked with vintage signage, college-sports memorabilia, and buzzing neon. Ragin Cajun also keeps customers in the know with a Craw Club and can customize buffet catering packages for off-site Acadian feasts, filling banquet halls with food, DJs, live zydeco bands, and complimentary gift bags filled with silent Xs.

930 Main St.
Houston,
TX
US

Mop's Grill's hearty surf-centric menu features Southern-style seafood augmented with specialty burgers, kabobs, tacos, and wings. Split an order of 12 wings and fries with fellow diners to open a meal ($12.99). Mop's famous mahi-mahi burger ($10) furnishes exotic appetites with inventive eating alongside the other proteins that Mop's can mold into patty form—including fried catfish, turkey, grilled rosemary chicken, and even beef ($8 each). For foldable fare, Uncle Boone's tacos are stuffed with fish, shrimp, or chicken ($4.50) and left under the restaurant's pillow each night by the taco fairy. Mop's menu also contains aqueous entrees capable of quelling the raging tide of hunger, such as Burma Jean's fried catfish ($13.70).

9882 Buffalo Speedway
Houston,
TX
US

Ever since brunch was first hybridized in a lab years ago by hungry scientists who couldn't wait until lunch, numerous attempts have been made to cross-breed the mutant meal with other cool things. Today's deal is the first to meet with success: $15 for $30 of bottomless brunch buffet with a complimentary mimosa and a digestive dose of live blues at Danton’s."Blind" Robert Travis: The genius behind such blues hits as "My Baby Don't See Things The Way I Don't," and "What's The Big Deal About Movies?," died of blindness in 1972. Today, his spirit inhabits his old guitar, which he hopes is found and played by an orphan whom he can magically gift with the ability to play the blues before possessing his body and living again through him.

4611 Montrose Blvd
Houston,
TX
US

The name Rainbow Lodge might sound like something out of a fairy tale. But then, isn't there something magical about a 100-year-old log cabin nestled on a full-acre of lush gardens? Add in the three fireplaces and the fact that this fairytale-like setting is located just a few minutes from downtown, and suddenly it's easy to see why such a place would deserve an enchanting name. And it's also easy to see why the Houston Press voted it one of the most romantic restaurants in town. But it takes more than just an idyllic setting to draw a loyal following. For 30 years, guests have come to this cozy lodge-like restaurant for wild game and regional gulf seafood. Surrounded by antique hunting and fishing memorabilia, diners sup on dishes like grilled North American elk chops with blue cheese and blue corn grits, or pan-seared red snapper served with brown buttered crawfish. Menus change seasonally to accommodate the freshest produce and meats from local farmers and ranchers, and some dishes even feature ingredients from the restaurant's onsite gardens or secret underground cucumber mines.

2011 Ella Blvd
Houston,
TX
US

Southern Italian dishes adorn white linen tablecloths inside both locations of Little Napoli Italian Cuisine. Chefs plate casual classics such as baked ziti and calzones as well as more elaborate entrees such as linguine pescatore, loaded with shrimp, calamari, clams, and mussels. The downtown location heats up its griddles for breakfast on weekday mornings, and the Westheimer location dishes out brunch fare such as omelets, waffles, and Napoli pasta on Saturdays and Sundays. Also on Westheimer Road, Friday nights entertain patrons with karaoke, and both locations host a VIP private-dining section that can seat up to 40 people or one very hungry velociraptor.

540 Texas St
Houston,
TX
US

The Fish Place ebbs cravings for Cajun fare with platefuls of deep-fried and grilled tilapia, blackened catfish, and creole favorites. Dinner guests edify taste buds by licking scientific journals or introducing them to dapper appetizers, such as the shrimp brochette, crab ball, or stuffed jalapeño. Then chefs immerse five pieces of catfish, tilapia, oyster, shrimp, or chicken tenders in a deep fryer and serve the crispy morsels with garlic bread and two selections of jambalaya rice, Cajun fries, or hush puppies. For quick nourishment between meetings or poetry throw-downs, the kitchen yields portable eats such as po boys and crawfish étouffée.

13053 Fm 529 Rd
Houston,
TX
US