Vegetarian Restaurants in Westmont

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Qdoba's burrito baristas handcraft a catering menu of Mexican-inspired cuisine, customizable with a panoply of fresh ingredients for a taco, nacho, or burrito bar. Qdoba's culinary crafters craft succulent fillings for burritos, tacos, nachos, and quesadillas, including protein-packing choices, such as slow-roasted pulled pork, adobo-marinated grilled steak or chicken, and spiced shredded or ground beef, with vegetarian options also available. Taste the gooey flavor accents of the signature queso sauce, a three-cheese blend with roasted poblanos, tomatoes, and jalapeños, the pinto or black beans simmered in cumin and onion, or the creamy, hand-smashed guacamole that's ideal for filling up Queen Elizabeth's diamond-studded guacamole chalice. Tortilla chips with salsa bar and desserts complete each catered event, and customers can opt for burrito-boxed lunches and any add-ons.

5221 W Rosecrans Ave
Hawthorne,
CA
US

Tonya Beaudet was perplexed when a strange sign appeared on the door of her favorite restaurant in 1980. Before long, she deduced that “Here today, gone to Maui” meant that its surf-crazy owner had traded California’s waves for those of Hawaii. Filled with visions of organic feasts, she scrambled to buy the shop, otherwise known as The Spot Natural Food Restaurant. House-made vegetarian fare has ruled the menu for more than 30 years, transforming Tonya into a meat-free eater and converting unabashed carnivores into legume lovers. Sautéed mushrooms and onions crown the restaurant’s veggie burger, whose blend of beans, seeds, and soy cheese the Travel Channel deemed “jam-packed with flavor.” Brown rice and whole-wheat tortillas lend wholesome goodness to hearty burritos, savory garden omelets brim with seasonal produce, and organic ales and purified water refresh palates between bites, preventing diners from plunging into the nearby ocean. To accommodate a wide range of dietary needs, the kitchen can prepare meals without wheat, dairy, or sugar. Tonya and crew’s cookbook helps diners recreate their favorite dishes at home, using healthy ingredients such as garden-grown veggies and raw agave.

110 2nd St
Hermosa Beach,
CA
US

The chefs at Annapurna meld a variety of authentic herbs and spices with veggie-laden entrees to craft a menu of savory Indian eats. The cheese dosa Annapurna special stuffs its pillowed crepe with a hearty blend of marinated mozzarella cheese, tomato, and cilantro ($8.95), dueling the succulent flavors of the Hyderabadi baingan ka bharta curry—fresh eggplant from the clay oven with an armful of chopped onions, diced tomatoes, and a special spice blend ($9.95). Batter-fried pieces of cauliflower bask in a garlic sauce with tomato accents in the gobi manchurian ($10.95), finishing off appetites with orders of the garlic naan ($3) or two vegetable samosas that barely manage to contain a potato-and-mixed-vegetable mélange within its crispy crusts ($4.50). A cultural immersion from "hello" to "holla back," Annapurna keeps guests cozy with a dining room TV broadcasting a range of Bollywood movies and sports.

10200 Venice Blvd
Culver City,
CA
US

Happy Veggie screams freshness, from the smiling tomato on its sign to the paintings of green foliage that surround the restaurant's casual dining room. The chefs here specialize in Asian cuisine, just without certain ingredients. No meat, poultry, fish, eggs, or MSG finds its way into the Happy Veggie kitchen. Instead, the chefs use tofu and soy meats to put vegetarian spins on classic dishes, including what LA Weekly dubs a "pretty damn good animal-less pho."

Local vegetables are indispensable to this menu. Chefs use market-fresh produce to make salads, stir-fries, and curry-vegetable masala. They finish meals with coconut cheesecake or veggie flan, which they make with soy whipped cream and maple syrup that's as pure as the day it was wrung from a tree like a sponge.

Tip for first-time diners: don't come on Tuesdays, when the restaurant is closed.

709 N Pacific Coast Hwy
Redondo Beach,
CA
US

For the casual observer passing Tuk Tuk, it might seem as though there has been an accident. The front of a tuk tuk—the Thai term for rickshaw—juts from the front of the building above the awning, as though its wheel has just burst through the wall. But if that observer ventured inside, they would find neither debris nor an apologetic teleporter proclaiming that his calculations were off. Instead they would see diners seated beneath colorful wall art and hanging lamps whose shades resemble curving Möbius strips, or, according to one review from Gayot, snail shells. Then, once the adrenaline faded and reality set in, the investigating observer would be smacked by what was so obvious to everyone else: the aroma of mingling spices.

A compendium of noodle dishes, wok stir-fries, curries, and house specialties, the menu prioritizes the power of complementary ingredients. According to the same Gayot review, chef Aoi Rattanamanee has a particular knack for seasoning grilled dishes: "Chicken is marinated overnight in garlic, cilantro and black pepper, fostering deep flavor." The spicy basil fried rice mixes chili and thai basil within a vegetable medley, and the Crying Tiger beef derives its zest from garlic, galangal root, and soybean sauce. Those in search of proven staples can indulge in pad thai or one of three curry variants, whose ingredients have all simmered in a creamy coconut milk.

8875 W Pico Blvd
Los Angeles,
CA
US

As a dedicated vegan, the eponymous owner of Rahel Ethiopian Veggie Cuisine, Rahel Woldmedhin, foregoes traditional meat and fish dishes for completely animal-free feasts that have helped the eatery win “Best Ethnic Vegan Restaurant” in Los Angeles Magazine. Inside the spacious dining room, forks and spoons grace the tables, though they’re not necessarily the utensils diners should turn to first. Traditionally, Ethiopian feasters scoop up their food with injera bread, and it's no different at Rahel, where the menu consists mainly of vegan wot—a hearty stew and the perfect match for the soft and spongy injera. Diners can dive into 10 types of wot, chockfull of chickpeas, lentils, and potatoes, and sip on traditional drinks, such kombucha tea or 3D—a combination of suff, telba, and besso that CBS Los Angeles calls "addicting."

1047 S Fairfax Ave
Los Angeles,
CA
US