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Body ink comes in all shapes, sizes and designs at Apocalypse Tattoo in Seattle, where the seven on-staff artists promise to make up paying customers with whatever details they choose. The personable staff is more than willing to consult with customers on their latest ink before putting needle to skin, and have displays of their artistry around the well-lit shop to put customers at ease as to the level of service. Offering a decidedly manly vibe, complete with faux hardwood floors and wall-mounted antler racks, Apocalypse Tattoo is wonderfully serious about their work, and have inked up many in a city already used to sporting tats. With hours from noon to 8 p.m. daily, it’s easy to slide in to schedule an appointment for yourself.

1558 E Olive Way
Seattle,
WA
US

Tattoo artists April Cornell and her husband Jeff brought their distinct style of body art to Seattle’s Fremont neighborhood in 2007, opening Hidden Hand Tattoo. The shop’s five regular artists – not to mention the occasional guest artist – work with clients from all over King County to create body art in a comfortable, inviting atmosphere that feels more like a modern furniture store than a tattoo shop. Particularly nice for first-time clients, the shop keepers are cool about sharing examples of the artists’ past work and are willing to answer frequently asked questions from how to care for your tattoo to the oft-uttered “Does it hurt?” The shop is open daily from noon to 8 p.m., and gladly accepts walk-ins when possible.

3516 Fremont Pl N
Seattle,
WA
US

Behind a storefront nestled amid Belltown's bleeding-edge galleries and Art Deco artifacts, a quiet revolution is brewing. The shop is Dzul Ink Lounge, and inside, tattoo artists and brothers Jacob and Alex Dzul are out to turn decades of preconceptions on their collective ear. Gone are the cheesy designs and abrasive alt-rock assaults that typify most tattoo parlors. Instead, visitors step into a lounge that has more in common with a contemporary art space, a quality that's also shared by the shop's vivid, customized tattoos. Whether they're getting their first tattoos or adding ink to an already impressive bodily canvas, clients can flip through an iPad filled with thousands of the shop's exclusive designs, or collaborate with one of the resident artists on designs that are as personal as they are precise.

2104 3rd Ave
Seattle,
WA
US

Liberty Tattoo recently moved from their University District digs to a new, stylish Lower Queen Anne site, complete with colorful accents, leather chairs and dark wood flooring. But the popular Seattle tattoo shop still offers the same quality of stylistic body art from three regular artists that each provide distinctive artistic touches. You can swing through for cartoonish depictions of an evil magician, colorful and majestic butterflies or the usual array of barbed-wire arm bands and old English lettering. The clean and lively storefront is open from noon to 10 p.m. daily, catering to both tattoo junkies and body art first-timers.

5006 University Way NE
Seattle,
WA
US

To call The Body Shop a mere skin and body care store is to miss half of what makes it special. Late founder Dame Anita Roddick was a pioneer for ethical business practices; upon opening her first store in Brighton, England, in 1976, she developed company values such as "Defend Human Rights" and "Protect The Planet." She somehow balanced principles and profit, partnering in global campaigns with UNICEF, Greenpeace, Amnesty International, and the United Nations, all while ultimately expanding her brand into 2,500 locations in over 60 international markets. After her death in 2007, then-British Prime Minister Gordon Brown said, ?She campaigned for green issues for many years before it became fashionable to do so and inspired millions to the cause by bringing sustainable products to a mass market. . . . She was an inspiration.?

Indeed, the Body Shop exhibits an eco-friendliness and social consciousness that's hard to come by in a company of its size. Its products have been fair-trade since 1987, and its Against Animal Testing movement led to an EU-wide ban of animal testing of cosmetics. The products are made from ingredients harvested from around the world: shea butter from Ghana goes into body scrubs and butters, and Indian artisans craft wooden massagers and tote bags that are screenprinted by hand. But all that isn't to say the company's production practices overshadow its final products. Skincare treatments such as the brand?s iconic body butters, facial products, and gift collections often appear in Allure, Marie Claire, Lucky, Seventeen and other national publications.

401 NE Northgate Way
Seattle,
WA
US