Movies in Wildwood

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Hi-Pointe Theatre first opened its doors in 1922. Unlike other venues built during that era, it was always intended as a place to watch movies?not plays, vaudeville performances, or boxing matches between presidential candidates. Despite its age, Hi-Pointe hasn't had any problem keeping up with current trends. It features a new screen, a booming sound system, and even free Wi-Fi, all while retaining the historical charm and aquamarine seating that visitors have come to adore over the years. Plus, of-age moviegoers can purchase beer and wine at the theatre, and guests of all ages can enjoy Hi-Pointe's reasonably priced popcorn and soda.

1005 McCausland Ave.
St. Louis,
MO
US

MX Movies is not an ordinary multiplex, as guests find out once they sink into the cozy seating, complete with armrests they can tuck out of the way if they want to get closer to a loved one or beloved tub of popcorn. The kitchen serves food that goes beyond the average nachos from a concession stand. Instead, viewers nosh on wraps, flatbread pizzas, even shrimp cocktail, and offer such desserts as brownies and ice cream. Afterwards, movie goers can discuss plot twists or credits font over craft beers in the lounge.

618 Washington Ave.
Saint Louis,
MO
US

Skyview Drive-In Theater, opened in 1949, has weathered the ravages of multiple tornados, enduring as a two-screen throwback to old-school cinema. When the sun sets, the twin screens display double features of recent Hollywood releases in clear digital format, while FM radio simulcasts the soundtracks. The viewing area?organized so taller cars never cut off smaller cars' sightlines?borders a playground for youngsters and a concession stand with classic movie snacks. Celebrating its roots, the theater occasionally hosts classic car (defined as 1987 or older) night where the driver is admitted free. For first-timers, Skyview Drive-In offers thorough responses to FAQs.

5700 N Belt W
Belleville,
IL
US

Before hosting moviegoers, the 111,000-square-foot Moolah Temple was home to a colony of pigeons. According to Amy Gill, co-head of the 1913-built temple's restoration team in 2003, the birds were "living in every crack and crevice" among debris, peeling paint, and cracked floors. Thanks to the team's refurbishing, leather couches and love seats, as well as balcony and stadium seating, now adorn the bird-free theater. Moolah Theatre only boasts a single screen, but what it lacks in quantity is made up for in size: its 20-by-45-foot screen showcases everything from the latest Hollywood releases to midnight movie staples such as The Big Lebowski.

Like "The Dude," Moolah Theatre celebrates bowling with eight lanes at its in-house retro alley. Post-flick fun can also include playing billiards, blasting tunes on the StarLink Internet Jukebox, or burping arcade games that ate too many quarters. Some lucky residents even call these amenities home—besides the theater and bowling alley, Moolah Temple makes room upstairs for 40 luxury lofts.

3821 Lindell Blvd
Saint Louis,
MO
US

Something new is always happening at Saint Louis Science Center, where hundreds of staff members and volunteers ignite visitors’ passion for science and technology with educational exhibitions and special events. The center houses a four-story Omnimax Theater, a hands-on life-science lab and atrium, and a variety of constantly changing exhibitions that draw 1.2 million visitors every year. More than 9,000 stars revolve around the 80-foot domed ceiling of the James S. McDonnell Planetarium, whose two levels of exhibits explore the future of space travel, life on the international space station, or Pluto’s bureaucratic search to regain planetary status.

5050 Oakland Ave
Saint Louis,
MO
US