Sightseeing in Willimantic

Up to 53% Off at The Mashantucket Pequot Museum

Mashantucket

$40 $20

One of the world's largest museums that celebrates Native American history, art, and culture; walk-through dioramas and live performances

50% Off a Haunted-History Walking Tour

Downtown

$50 $25

A two-hour walking tour covers most haunted areas and allows guests to conduct their own paranormal investigation

The Mark Twain House and Museum – Up to 46% Off

Asylum Hill

$36 $20

The house of literary legend Samuel Clemens casts a light on his personality and career as well as America in the 19th century

Children's Museum of Southeastern Connecticut – 32% Off

East Lyme

$28 $19

Children build a skyscraper, learn about new cultures, and explore the sciences with hands-on exhibits

Up to 54% Off Museum Admission or Class

Windsor

$14 $7

(6)

Museum follows the evolution of electronic communication from early radio and telegraph to modern television and computers

The New Children's Museum – Up to 44% Off

West Hartford

$29.50 $17

(50)

Museum engages kids with hands-on and interactive activities and exhibits, including a wildlife sanctuary and planetarium shows

New Britain Museum of American Art – Up to 48% Off Admission

New Britain

$24 $13

Collection of 10,000 works of art includes oils, acrylics, and sculptures culled from more than 300 years of American artistic endeavors

Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame – Up to 58% Off

Forest Park

$42 $19

(162)

40,000-sq.-ft. basketball haven houses shrines to more than 300 Hall of Famers, 70+ interactive exhibits, and a full-size court for practice

$12 for a Ghost Tour

Multiple Locations

$25 $12

Tour guides lead 90-minute strolls through haunted locales and tell tales of scandal with historical facts

Up to 25% Off Shark-Cage-Diving Experience

South Kingstown

$250 $189

Divers sail out up to 50 mi. from shore before hopping into an anodized-aluminum-pipe cage for the chance to see blue and mako sharks

Up to Half Off Urban Dare Adventure Race for Two

Downtown Providence

$90 $45

Fast-paced competition challenges teams of two with trivia, photo hunts, and mental and physical challenges

Select Local Merchants

Inside a neo-Romanesque building on the Norwich Free Academy campus, Slater Memorial Museum traces local and world history with an extensive art collection. More than 150 plaster casts of classical and Renaissance sculpture tower above basketry, ceremonial masks, and leatherwork from African artisans, as well as artifacts from Mesopotamia and Persia. Saving space for those from North American shores, the museum also displays work from 19th-century Norwich artists, such as Denison Crocker and John Trumbull, plus pieces from 20th-century Connecticut artists, such as Ozias Dodge and Charlotte Fuller Eastman. The galleries host annual rotating exhibitions and events. Visitors courting their own muse can craft metal art and jewelry at adult art classes, and kid artistes sample a range of disciplines from printmaking and watercolors.

108 Crescent St
Norwich,
CT
US

At Lutz Children's Museum, curious young ones aged 2 to 10 explore rotating hands-on exhibits to soak up knowledge and stoke imagination flames. Dismount aluminum covered wagons and kick off a terra firma cultural journey at the main street exhibit, which depicts a World War II-era American village, including a detailed shop and school. Meanwhile, the farm exhibit vividly displays 19th-century Connecticut farm life, where kids can collect eggs from hens, climb in a hayloft, milk the resident cow, or psychoanalyze their moos. Colorful works decorate the halls of the children's art gallery, which occasionally features the creative work of professional artists, while cuddleful perks await visitors of the rescued live animals, where a chinchilla named Bounce currently prowls the grounds alongside about 50 other cute creatures.

247 S Main St
Manchester,
CT
US

Longtime resident of northeastern Connecticut, Carly Martin founded Silver Circle in 2008 with the belief that art is the glue that keeps communities together, granting local artists a space to exhibit their masterworks, hosting classes for aspiring Picassos to hone their craft, and providing a venue for jewelry makers to sell their crafts. The original pieces in Martin's gallery––which have included works by Jean-Paul Jacquet and George Chaplin––rotate on a four- to six-week schedule, and featured exhibits can be viewed in the main hall every Tuesday through Sunday, or through an enchanted mirror on Monday. Rather than having a decorative mindset while choosing the pieces for the gallery, Martin takes a more spontaneous approach, telling the Putnam Villager, “We don't concern ourselves with 'matching'... If a piece of artwork speaks to us, it can change our whole space and add energy and interest in unexpected ways. Art truly breathes life into a home.”

75 Main St
Putnam,
CT
US

Within a 308,000-square-foot complex run by the government of the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation lies the keys to unlock 20,000 years of Native American history. Atop a 185-foot tower made from stone and glass, visitors drink in views of the region before heading back downstairs to visit the exhibits. Life-size, walk-through dioramas and live performances tell stories via interactive means, and two libraries keep archival materials that are perusable by children and adults. In addition to the permanent exhibits, special events take place throughout the year from harvest festivals to beading circles.

110 Pequot Trl
Mashantucket,
CT
US

Founded in 1975, Real Art Ways is one of the United States' leading innovative contemporary-arts organizations. The cinema at Real Art Ways screens first-run and classic independent films seven nights a week for the viewing pleasure of card-carrying art haus-ers and visually starved celluloid fanatics alike ($9 for non-members, $5 for members). Leave the distracting 4G smart-toaster at home to put all the focus on Life 2.0, a thought-provoking film about human interaction in the digital age. Vintage hits like the horrifying Japanese 1977 flick House and the slightly less-horrifying 1955 Guys and Dolls share silver-screen space with surprising ease. Visit the calendar for a full list of show times.

56 Arbor St
Hartford,
CT
US

Today, science lets children as young as 7 years old stand in the eye of a hurricane and fly over the surface of Mars—at least at the Connecticut Science Center. The multi-sensory center encourages all ages to explore the exciting side of natural and man-made phenomena. Whether they're braving gale-force winds in the hurricane simulator or engaging with exotic critters in the live animal touch tanks, visitors play an active role in the center's more than 150 hands-on exhibits. In the Sight and Sound Experience, adventurers feel sound vibrations, experiment with lasers and movement, and hear light, whereas Planet Earth encourages them to probe for fossils in a real seabed core. Exploring Space journeys outside the atmosphere with moon rocks and an up-close visit to a black hole, before Invention Dimension, which features LEGOs, returns to Earth so that fledgling engineers can build their own Rube Goldberg machine without the calculating the effects of zero gravity.

Recently, the center welcomed its newest resident: a sound-equipped animatronic dilophosaurus, whose reptilian movements and noises recreate the goosebumps felt during the species's starring role in Jurassic Park. Robotics also play a central role in Forces in Motion, which introduces the fundamentals of engineering and design through the use of sleek, responsive mechanical flyers. The center's dedication to machine life also extends to its partnerships; working with First Niagara Bank Foundation and scientist Tim Gifford, the center sponsors a teen robotics team for camps and competitions.

Beyond the permanent exhibits, the museum is also a frequent stop for headline-grabbing traveling exhibits from around the country; with multiple exhibits coming through every year, no visit is likely to be the same as the last. The center also houses learning areas suited to even smaller guests: in KidSpace, ages 3–6 splash in a water play area, partake in story time, experiment with a wall of magnetic balls, and test their object recognition in searching activities designed by I Spy author Walter Wick. Beyond the exhibits, a state-of-the-art 3D digital theatre screens science-focused films, and four educational labs host special events such as summer exploration camps and experiments in cootie vaccination. An on-site café, meanwhile, keeps visitors fueled with dishes made from organic, locally sourced ingredients. All of this academic adventure unfold in the center's sleek building, which honors its green architecture with a rooftop garden boasting panoramic views of Hartford.

250 Columbus Blvd
Hartford,
CT
US