Kids Activities in Highlands


Select Local Merchants

Howard Pyle's unexpected death in 1912 brought a group of artists, entrepreneurs, and businessmen together to grieve their friend. They couldn't let the artist's passion for teaching and illustration disappear as quickly as he had; so, they decided to form the Wilmington Society of Fine Arts with the sole purpose of preserving his legacy. They gathered funds from locals who felt just as strongly as they did?family members, friends, students, fans?and purchased approximately 100 pieces of his artwork.

Little did they know that, with these 100 pieces, they were starting something greater than a memorial for a good friend. The Wilmington Society of Fine Arts would, over time, add more and more artwork to its collection, growing into an 80,000-square-foot space and out of its original name. The Delaware Art Museum, as its called today, now counts more than 12,000 works of art as part of its collection. Permanent features showcase British pre-Raphaelites, the urban landscapes of John Sloan, modern American art, and, of course, Howard Pyle. The masterpieces don't stop when visitors venture outside?the Copeland Sculpture Garden adorns its lush natural scenery with nine works from the museum's permanent collection, along with a massive outdoor labyrinth.

2301 Kentmere Parkway
Wilmington,
DE
US

Our mission is to provide a serene and clean space with enthusiastic and learned teachers. Our unique path will guide you to improved function of the body, clarity of mind and a greater sense of awareness.

2000 Pennsylvania Ave
Wilmington,
DE
US

The Theatre N at Nemours makes its home in downtown Wilmington, but its films come from far beyond the city's borders. The theater not only screens independent films from around the world, but its digital projection system also allows first-run features to appear in Wilmington at the same time as in larger cities. That way, locals are able to take in these exciting dramas, comedies, and documentaries when everyone else is talking about them too. As patrons watch in a comfortable auditorium that seats 200+, they also get plenty of snack choices like freshly popped popcorn and candy from the concession stand.

1007 N Orange St
Wilmington,
DE
US

Nestled inside a former railroad-car factory, the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts took shape in 1979, led by a small group of artists and art patrons. The DCCA moved to a permanent location in 2000—one with 35,000 square feet of space, seven galleries, and individual studios for 26 artists—but still clings to its original mission of building public appreciation for contemporary art through exhibitions and educational programs.

Although the center is a noncollecting museum, it does feature roughly 30 exhibits each year from regional, national, and international artists. These shifting collections explore relevant societal themes such as the public obsession with celebrity, the flippant nature of consumerism, and the effects urban metropolises have on how humans relate to nature and each other. The exhibits can use any variety of media, and the studio artists embrace this same freedom by using everything from paints to video in their works.

To engage visitors outside the gallery spaces, the DCCA hosts educational programs for adults as well as exploratory classes for children, which help wee ones create their own relevant, meaningful pieces. Tours allow groups to learn more about the exhibits while an informed guide tries to recite every single anagram of Delaware.

200 S Madison St
Wilmington,
DE
US

Before new shows came to Broadway, they debuted in Wilmington. The DuPont Theatre was constructed in 1913 as a stately venue for big musicals to find their legs outside the city, and to serve as a hub for more homegrown events. The massive stage hosted spectacles including a train-collision scene and live-animal performances, as well as performances by Fred Astaire, Bette Davis, and Orson Welles.?

Over the years, the theater withstood building mishaps and the dwindling theater audiences of the '40s and '50s, when Hollywood began shrinking actors down to fit inside movie projectors. Rather than show films, DuPont stepped up its production schedules and catered to its diverse audience, slashing ticket prices for students and building an infrared sound system for hearing-impaired guests. It also renovated the space and added a children's series to introduce youngsters to science, history, and literature through theatre.?

It all worked. Today, DuPont remains a destination for live entertainment, beckoning residents and visitors to shows that have included Cats, Les Miserables, and Hello, Dolly!

1007 N Market St.
Wilmington,
DE
US

Tickets for Fred Garbo are general admission. For the other two shows, the $33 and $35 tickets correspond to maroon sections on the upper and lower seating levels.

818 N Market St
Wilmington,
DE
US