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American Museum of Tort Law

654 Main Street, Winsted

Admission for Two, Four, or Six to American Museum of Tort Law (Up to 57% Off)

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Sale ends in:07:58:58

Highlights

Visitors have an opportunity to learn about the tort law, trial by jury, and important precedent-setting cases in an entertaining manner

Customer Reviews

100% Verified Reviews
All reviews are from people who have redeemed deals with this merchant.
M
Marytop reviewer
110 ratings31 reviews
September 14, 2017
Small but we learned a lot. If your timing is right, Mr Nader may stop by.
C
CaSondratop reviewer
9 ratings7 reviews
July 19, 2017
Very friendly and fun afternoon in a beautiful building!!
J
Joy
2 ratings2 reviews
February 14, 2017
small, but interesting. exceeded expectations.

About This Deal

Fine Print

Promotional value expires 180 days after purchase. Amount paid never expires. Limit 4 per person. May be repurchased every 365 days. Must use promotional value in 1 visit(s). Valid only for option purchased. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

About American Museum of Tort Law

Where can you find a good lawyer? In a joke, the answer would be "in a cemetery." But at the American Museum of Tort Law, the answer is "in every exhibit." The museum is a repository for some of the most famous or infamous lawsuits in the land. It gives visitors a look behind the bench into the legal arguments and precedents set by landmark cases about hot McDonald's coffee and Big Tobacco.

  • What it covers: hundreds of years of tort law, starting with its roots in English common law
  • Eye catcher: a red Corvair, the basis for museum founder Ralph Nader's book Unsafe at Any Speed
  • Permanent mainstay: Gallery of Toys, a graveyard of dangerous toys and an homage to how tort laws benefit people
  • Don't miss: Shining a Light, an in-depth look at the wrongs that are righted through civil litigation
  • Coming soon: a full-size courtroom where lawyers will re-enact landmark cases for live and webcast audiences