Boarding or Daycare at Carolinas Critter Sitters Doggie Daycare (Up to 63% Off). Three Options Available.

South Charlotte

Value Discount You Save
$120 54% $65
Give as a Gift
Limited quantity available
Over 360 bought

In a Nutshell

Trained caretakers look after pups while their owners are out of town or away for the day

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires 180 days after purchase. Amount paid never expires. New customers only. Appointment required. Limit 1 per person, may buy 1 additional as a gift. Limit 1 per visit. Valid only for option purchased. All goods or services must be used by the same person. Additional dogs will be at the regular price. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Choose from Three Options

  • $55 for three nights of single-room canine boarding ($120 value)
  • $29 for three days of doggie daycare ($75 value)
  • $55 for six days of doggie daycare ($150 value)

Canned or Dry Pet Food: Satisfying a Meat Tooth

Should you feed your pet wet food, dry food, or a little bit of both? Check out Groupon’s guide to the pros and cons of each approach.

To be frank, there’s no simple answer to the question of wet versus dry. It largely depends on an animal’s health, an owner’s lifestyle, and whether a pet refuses to eat anything but fondue. Mostly, the question hinges on the important differences between cats and dogs.

Cats are notoriously finicky eaters, though certain evolutionary traits may explain their discerning tastes. Unlike dogs, which can digest a wide variety of foods, cats are obligate carnivores, which means they depend almost entirely on animal protein in their diet. As a result, all their food, dry or wet, is derived from animals to some extent. Cats also face the risk of dehydration because of their poor thirst reflex—the signal the kidney sends to the brain that tells an animal it’s thirsty and needs to drink. Dry food, naturally, has much less moisture than canned food, which consists of as much as 78% water, so using wet food may help a cat stay hydrated, even in the midst of readily available water. Ultimately, the choice between wet and dry food comes down to a combination of the cat’s preferences, affordability, and time. Wet food is more expensive, for example, and spoils much sooner in the bowl—though it also lasts longer on the pantry shelf.

Dogs are a little more easygoing than cats when it comes to what’s for dinner, but they also think dinnertime lasts as long as there’s food in snout’s reach. You can’t necessarily trust a dog to mete out its rations, no matter its moisture content, so leaving a bowl of dry food out all day may lead to excessive snacking. Still, dry food is usually more convenient, and many brands provide the added benefit of aiding with dental health—a much larger problem with dogs than cats. Wet food may be a good choice for older dogs, who might be missing teeth or losing their sense of smell. At the end of the day, though, either can fulfill a dog’s nutritional needs—though, as with cats, owners should take care to read the label on food to make sure it meets nutritional requirements.

Customer Reviews

It is a big place with nice facilities, lot's of room for the dogs to run and play, the staff is also very nice and helpfull
Navani R. · March 13, 2016
Thank You! LeeLoo had a blast! She will see you again!!!!
Amanda · October 21, 2015
Great experience
Ashley C. · July 9, 2015

By purchasing this deal you'll unlock points which can be spent on discounts and rewards. Every 5,000 points can be redeemed for $5 Off your next purchase.