Chinese Food for Two or Four at Chili Brothers (40% Off)

National City

11 Ratings

Value Discount You Save
$20 40% $8
Give as a Gift
Limited quantity available
Over 50 bought

In a Nutshell

Menu includes sautéed eggplant with black bean sauce, stir-fried beef, Hunan-style frog with spicy sauce, fried curd pork, and braised fish

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires 120 days after purchase. Amount paid never expires. May be repurchased every 90 days. Limit 1 per person, may buy 1 additional as gift. Limit 1 per visit. Limit 1 per table. Not valid with other offers. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Choose Between Two Options

  • $12 for $20 worth of food for two
  • $24 for $40 worth of food for four

Scoville Scale: Quantifying Spiciness

For people who love spicy food, their steel tongue may be a source of pride, but just how hot is that pepper? Read on as Groupon explores the measurement known as the Scoville scale.

Since the human palate varies widely from person to person, determining how spicy something is by taste alone can be a bit like trying to measure the air temperature based on how much someone is sweating. Like a thermometer for the spiciness of peppers, the Scoville scale cuts through this sensory subjectivity by measuring the prevalence of capsaicin—the chemical compound responsible for delivering the spicy flavor—in chili peppers or foods that use them for pungent effect. The capsaicin content determines how many Scoville Heat Units (or SHU) are in a given food. A standard jalapeño pepper, for example, has somewhere between 2,500–5,000 SHU, whereas the hottest pepper in the world, the Carolina Reaper, checks in at around 2.2 million SHU. (Just for comparison, police-grade pepper-spray measures a fiery 5.3 million SHU, which is why it’s banned as an ingredient in most chili-cooking competitions.)

Named after its inventor, the Scoville scale dates back to 1912. While attempting to find a suitable pepper to use in an ointment, pharmacist Wilbur Scoville developed a process called the Scoville organoleptic test, which relied on human taste-testers to judge the piquancy of chili-pepper extracts. Subjects would taste the extract in its pure form then continue to sample it as Scoville diluted it with water. The degree to which a pepper’s extract had to be diluted before subjects could no longer feel the heat determined its placement on the scale. Today, a process called high-performance liquid chromatography can determine the exact concentration of capsaicin, eliminating the need for human taste testers. That’s probably for the best, since it might be dangerous to test the limitations of the human tongue; in 2013, the United Kingdom’s Daily Mail reported a story of a British doctor who broke into tears and hallucinations after (voluntarily) consuming a curry that measured 6 million SHU.

Customer Reviews

11 Ratings

Very friendly place. Go hungry. Lots of food.
Joseph C. · September 20, 2015
We really enjoyed the food (there is plenty of it) and the service was prompt and very friendly. I would recommend this restaurant.
Cheryl J. · August 25, 2015
Go there! The food is great!
Michael W. · August 10, 2015
Merchant Location Map
  1. 1

    National City

    4 North Euclid Avenue

    National City, CA 91950

    +16192668008

    Get Directions

15% Bonus Savings
Get an extra 15% off local restaurants, spas, salons, and more to use within 48 hours of your Goods order! See details
By purchasing this deal you'll unlock points which can be spent on discounts and rewards. Every 5,000 points can be redeemed for $5 Off your next purchase.
{}