$15 for $30 of Bottomless Brunch Buffet, and a Complimentary Mimosa at Danton’s Seafood Kitchen

The Museum District

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In a Nutshell

  • Houston’s only live blues brunch
  • Huge board of fare
  • Two brunch shows set to live local blues bands

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires Apr 25, 2010. Amount paid never expires. Limit 1 per person. May buy multiple as gifts. No cash back or credit. Dine-in only. Not valid with other offers. Not valid Easter Sunday. Tax and gratuity not included. Must be 21 to enjoy mimosa. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Danton's Seafood Kitchen - The Museum District: $15 for $30 of Bottomless Brunch Buffet, and a Complimentary Mimosa at Danton’s Seafood Kitchen

Jump to: Reviews | The Ghosts of The Blues

Ever since brunch was first hybridized in a lab years ago by hungry scientists who couldn't wait until lunch, numerous attempts have been made to cross-breed the mutant meal with other cool things. Today's deal is the first to meet with success: $15 for $30 of bottomless brunch buffet with a complimentary mimosa and a digestive dose of live blues at Danton’s.

Legend has it that self-taught cook and blues fan Danton Nix went to the crossroads and learned his recipes from the Devil in exchange for a Robert Johnson mixtape. Since then, Nix and Danton's co-owner Kyle Teas have won converts all over Houston with their blues-inspired brunch menu. Danton’s brunch features bottomless batches of homemade biscuits, eggs, cheese and poblano grits, chicken and sausage gumbo, crawfish etouffee, okra and tomatoes, blackened catfish enchiladas, boiled shrimp, fried catfish and oysters, key lime pie, choco cake, and an uncanny number of other brunchable munchables.

Danton's also hosts Houston’s only live blues brunch. The first brunch seating, with live sets from local blues bands, lasts from 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m., with a second brunch-and-blues lasting from 1:30 p.m. to 3:15 pm. Audiences get nearly two hours of fond eats and soul-stirred tunes from a scene that understands and embodies the significance of Houston blues. With the sonic-blood of Texas Johnny Brown, Milton Hopkins, and Earl Gilliam running through the veins of modern Houston blues, the music acts as the perfect guide to your brunching quest.

Reviews

Citysearchers give Danton’s 4.5 stars and the Urbanspoon crowd approves at 91%:

  • Everything I have had has been cooked to perfection. I am pretty picky about my seafood and as a cajun I'm pretty critical. The food is phenomenal. – houstongirl79, Citysearch
  • . . . hands down the best Gulf Coast seafood in town for two reasons: Simple, tasteful recipes and very fresh fish and ingredients. – texas08, Citysearch
  • When you have 2 best friends who grew up with coastal nostalgia in their bones, and an educated tooth and tongue for texas seafood, it is a winning combo – jim nance, Urbanspoon

The Ghosts of The Blues

Modern-day blues musicians like to feel the spirit of old blues greats when they play. And the ghosts of old blues musicians like to stick around on Earth and see if they can't fix what made them so blue in the first place. Here's what some notable, deceased blues musicians are up to these days:

"Blind" Robert Travis: The genius behind such blues hits as "My Baby Don't See Things The Way I Don't," and "What's The Big Deal About Movies?," died of blindness in 1972. Today, his spirit inhabits his old guitar, which he hopes is found and played by an orphan whom he can magically gift with the ability to play the blues before possessing his body and living again through him.

Johnny "Bad Boy" Deville: He dropped out of seminary to play the blues and now haunts churches, where he is frequently mistaken as the spirit of important saints.

Martin "Happy" Oliver: This blues drummer was renowned for feeling the blues, despite having a great marriage, fame, wealth, and everything else a person could want. He suffered from anhedonia, the inability to feel pleasure, and died from Lazy Man's Starvation in 1988. He has roamed the Earth since, and currently haunts old Geocities pages.

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Customer Reviews

This place is awesonme!
Lonique P. · August 29, 2014
Merchant Location Map
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    The Museum District

    4611 Montrose Blvd

    Houston, Texas 77006

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