Boston Philharmonic Orchestra Presents Mahler's Symphony No. 9 on Friday, April 25, at 8 p.m. (Up to 40% Off)

Symphony Hall

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In a Nutshell

Mahler's final completed symphony meditates on death with distorted waltzes and a dissonant sendup of Baroque counterpoint

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires Apr 25, 2014. Limit 8 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Redeem starting 4/25/14 for a ticket at venue will call. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Symphony Hall. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must purchase together to sit together. Discount reflects Boston Philharmonic Orchestra's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. Doors open 90 minutes before showtime. For ADA seating, call box office promptly upon receipt of voucher - availability is limited. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Boston Philharmonic Orchestra presents Mahler's Symphony No. 9 - Symphony Hall: Boston Philharmonic Orchestra Presents Mahler's Symphony No. 9 on Friday, April 25, at 8 p.m. (Up to 40% Off)

Humans have five senses: hearing, seeing, touching, tasting, and hearing through the other ear. Treat at least three of them with this GrouponLive deal.

The Deal

  • One ticket to see the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra present Mahler's Symphony No. 9
  • When: Friday, April 25, at 8 p.m.
  • Where: Symphony Hall
  • Door time: 6:30 p.m.; pre-concert talk begins at 6:45 p.m.
  • Ticket values include all fees.

Seating Options

Mahler's Symphony No. 9

Haunted by the death of his young daughter and recently diagnosed with a heart condition, Mahler hesitated to begin a ninth symphony, fearing that—like Beethoven and Bruckner before him—it would be his last. His fears were realized, but there could be no better way for him to bid adieu to the symphonic form. His take on death and finality proves deep and complex. The first symphony since Haydn to begin with a slow movement, it opens with a halting string-and-horn pulse, calling to mind Mahler's failing heart. But alongside this sober theme there are also moments of nostalgia and even of parody, as the score quotes everything from his own early works to the Baroque form of a rondo, turned dark and thrashing.

Boston Philharmonic Orchestra

In 1979, conductor Benjamin Zander assembled 96 musicians of all stripes, with students, professionals, and amateur players dedicating themselves to performing music together. That diversity still holds true today. As the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra proudly states on their website, "The professionals maintain the highest standard, the students keep the focus on training and education, and the gifted amateurs...remind everybody that music-making is an expression of enthusiasm and love."

Such enthusiasm has attracted an all-star lineup of renowned soloists; Yo-Yo Ma, Oscar Shumsky, and Russell Sherman have all played with the BPO at various venues throughout Boston and the Northeast. Most concerts are preceded by lectures from Zander—who still serves as Maestro—to help audiences further understand the music. Discussions often cover the works' structures and when to listen for the timpanist's syncopated hiccups.

  1. 1

    Symphony Hall

    301 Massachusetts Ave.

    Boston, MA 02115

    +16172662378

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