Los Angeles Philharmonic

Walt Disney Concert Hall

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In a Nutshell

An evening of German and Austrian works from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries; Mussorgsky anchors a program of music based on paintings

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires Dec 6, 2014. Limit 8 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Redeem starting day of show for a ticket at venue box office. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Walt Disney Concert Hall. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must redeem together to sit together. Discount reflects Ticketmaster's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. Doors open 1 hour before showtime. For ADA accommodations, call box office promptly upon receipt of voucher - availability is limited. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

The Deal

Available Concert and Seating Options

Dudamel & Capuçon on November 28 at 8 p.m.

  • for the balcony (up to value)
  • for terrace E or W (up to value)
  • for the terrace (up to value)
  • for orchestra E or W (up to value)

Pictures at an Exhibition on December 4–5 at 8 p.m.

  • for the front terrace or terrace on December 4 or 5 (up to value)
  • $83 for orchestra seating on December 5 (up to $137.50 value)

Dudamel & Capuçon

Conducted by LA Philharmonic music director Gustavo Dudamel, this program presents German and Austrian works from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. World-renowned cellist Gautier Capuçon lends his bow to the program, taking center stage on Haydn’s Cello Concerto.

  • Reger—Four Tone Poems after Arnold Böcklin: Composed in 1913 and known collectively as The Böcklin Suite, each chapter celebrates a different painting by Swiss artist Alfred Böcklin. First comes the meditative The Hermit Playing the Violin, in which cherubs spy on a secluded musician. Next, the jubilant At Play in the Waves sonically conjures a mystical land where sirens swim with satyrs. The Isle of the Dead takes on an ominous tone thanks to its inspiration of a rocky island jutting out from still waters. Finally, the Bacchanal suite celebrates the joyful image of revelers dancing around a maypole.
  • Haydn—Cello Concerto in C: Haydn composed this three-movement baroque work for his cellist friend Joseph Franz Weigl and a small ensemble around 1761. The manuscript was then lost for 200 years before it was finally uncovered at the Prague National Museum.
  • Schubert—Symphony No. 6: This piece was written in 1818, but didn’t premiere in public for ten years. Its nickname is the “Little C major” because Schubert wrote his 1840 Ninth in the same key.

Pictures at an Exhibition

What happens when an image inspires music? Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic demonstrate with a kaleidoscopic evening of new works and hallowed classics.

  • Salonen—Helix: The Philharmonic’s Conductor Laureate Esa-Pekka Salonen premieres his latest work, which mirrors the structure of a spiral and, according to the composer, “pushe[s] through constantly narrowing concentric circles until the music reaches a point where it has to stop as it has nowhere to go.”
  • Rachmaninoff—Isle of Dead: Moved to composition by the eponymous Böcklin painting of a small boat approaching a mysterious island, Rachmaninoff opens by mirroring the rhythm of rowing oars with a funereal 5/8 time signature. From there, he builds to an ultimately cathartic escape from grief, blending in the plainchant of a medieval requiem mass along the way.
  • Mussorgsky—Pictures at an Exhibition: Instantly recognizable for the stately “Promenade” that guides ears through aural renderings of 10 paintings, each with its own distinctive colors and personality. Listeners may feel the same ecstasy that its composer did: “Ideas, melodies, come to me of their own accord. Like roast pigeons in the story, I gorge and gorge and over-eat myself. I can hardly manage to put it all down on paper fast enough.”

Los Angeles Philharmonic

The orchestra performs concerts that tunefully blend classical works with new pieces, and continually seeks new ways to engage audiences. Many evenings, for instance, are preceded by an Upbeat Live talk, covering the program's historical and cultural context and opening the floor for Q&As with guest artists. A thriving youth orchestra program, YOLA, shares the joys of classical music with a fresher-faced generation. And the Green Umbrella program invites guests to hear world-premiere compositions. That novel approach to listener engagement seems to have caught on—every year, Los Angeles Philharmonic shares music with more than two million ears.

Merchant Location Map
  1. 1

    Walt Disney Concert Hall

    111 S Grand Ave.

    Los Angeles, CA 90012

    +13238502000

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