Nashville Symphony & Chorus Perform Beethoven's Ninth

Schermerhorn Symphony Center

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In a Nutshell

The symphony performs Beethoven’s Ninth, “Ode to Joy”, and John Adams’ Pulitzer-winning meditation on 9/11

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires Sep 13, 2015. Limit 8 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Advance email redemption starting 8/5 or redeem at venue will call on 9/13. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must purchase together to sit together. Discount reflects Merchant's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. For ADA seating, call box office promptly upon receipt of voucher - availability is limited. Ticket value includes all fees. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

The Deal

  • $19 for one ticket to the Beethoven’s Ninth performed by the Nashville Symphony & Chorus on September 13 at 3 p.m. (up to $51 value)
  • When: Sunday, September 13, at 3 p.m.
  • Where: Schermerhorn Symphony Center
  • Seating: orchestra or balcony
  • Door time: 2 p.m.
  • Click here to view the seating chart

The Program

The Nashville Symphony, lead by Musical Director Giancarlo Guerrero, treats audiences to an emotionally stirring two-part program featuring Beethoven’s Ninth that ties into the 14th anniversary of 9/11. The Blair Children’s Choir and the Nashville Symphony Chorus lend their vocal harmonies to the affair, and audiences are invited to join the conductor and musicians for an hour-long pre-show discussion (as part of the Classical Conversations series), or an informal Q&A after the show.

  • Beethoven—Symphony No. 9: Nearly deaf when he composed his last symphony, Beethoven was the only person in the auditorium not to realize how well his thrilling “Ode to Joy” was received—legend says a soloist had to turn him around so that he could see the standing ovation.
  • John Adams—On the Transmigration of Souls: Commissioned by the New York Philharmonic and Lincoln Center’s “Great Performers” in the wake of the September 11th attacks, this mournful and meditative 25-minute piece employs children’s and adult choruses, ambient city sounds, and an oscillating orchestra to commemorate the lives lost that day. Its mix of tragedy, high emotion, and hope helped earned it the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for music.

Schermerhorn Symphony Center

Even though it opened in 2006, Schermerhorn Symphony Center looks like it's been a part of the landscape for centuries. That's because the center, which is named for Nashville Symphony's late maestro Kenneth Schermerhorn, took its design cues from famed European concert halls. Its classic appearance is enhanced by 30 soundproof windows, which allow natural sunlight or unnatural spaceship lights to stream in. A custom-built organ rings out through the hall, and a convertible seating design allows the hall to morph into a ballroom floor for cabaret shows or weddings.

Merchant Location Map
  1. 1

    Schermerhorn Symphony Center

    1 Symphony Pl.

    Nashville, TN 37201

    +16156876400

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