"A Symphonic Celebration" or "Triple Play"

Heinz Hall for the Performing Arts

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In a Nutshell

Resident conductor Lawrence Loh leads the symphony through Brahms; suites from films join operatic overtures and a romantic concerto

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires Aug 2, 2014. Limit 8 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Online or in-person reservation required 24 hours in advance. Pick up redeemed tickets at venue box office. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Heinz Hall. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must purchase together to sit together. Discount reflects Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. Doors open 1 hour before showtime. For ADA accommodations, call box office promptly upon receipt of voucher - availability is limited. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

"A Symphonic Celebration" or "Triple Play" - Heinz Hall for the Performing Arts: Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra's A Symphonic Celebration or Triple Play on July 25 or August 2 (Up to 65% Off)

The Deal

  • $20 for one ticket to see the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra’s A Symphonic Celebration or Triple Play (up to $56.50 value)
  • When: A Symphonic Celebration on Friday, July 25, at 7 p.m.; Triple Play on Saturday, August 2, at 7:30 p.m.
  • Where: Heinz Hall
  • Door time: one hour before showtime
  • Ticket values include all fees

Seating Options

A Symphonic Celebration Program

Resident conductor Lawrence Loh and virtuoso Russian pianist Olga Kern join the symphony for a selection of compositions that expertly soundtrack the summer.

  • Dvorak—Carnival Overture: The Czech composer wrote this rousing piece, full of spritely woodwinds and jaunty strings, as a part of his Nature, Life and Love trilogy. Its role: unsurprisingly, life.
  • Brahms—Symphony No. 3 in F Major: Although it debuted in 1883—with devotees of Brahms’s rival Wagner doing their best to sabotage the premiere—this symphony never went out of style. It can be heard in films such as Goodbye Again, in Frank Sinatra’s “Take My Love,” and in Civilization IV.
  • Rachmaninoff—Concerto No. 2 in C minor for Piano and Orchestra: Tolling like a funeral bell, the piano welcomes the orchestra for a melancholic sound, rising to a more triumphant note by the end of the first movement.

Highlights from Triple Play

Guest conductor Christian Capocaccia oversees this melodic evening, with Xiayin Wang at piano. Staying true to its name, the program splits into three 30-minute sets: the first featuring light favorites, the second a romantic concerto, and the third a suite from the big screen.

  • Offenbach—Intermezzo and Barcarolle from The Tales of Hoffmann: Jacques Offenbach’s magnum opus sees the titular character divulging his heartbreaks about an automaton, a singer, and a woman who, wanting to steal his reflection, obviously doesn’t understand how mirrors work.
  • Ravel—Concerto in G major for Piano and Orchestra: When discussing this jazz-influenced piece with the New York Philharmonic, the composer shared, “The opening theme came to me on a train between Oxford and London. But the initial idea is nothing . . . writing music is seventy-five percent an intellectual activity.”
  • Suites from Pirates of the Caribbean, The Star Wars Saga, and Batman: The Dark Knight Rises

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra was founded in 1896, and its reputation was as big as its sound right from the start. Andrew Carnegie was an early backer, and reportedly claimed that it was the best orchestra in the country. More than a century later, the organization still enjoys its status as a nationally renowned organization. And the PSO continues to take pride in its acclaim—perhaps expanding on Carnegie’s earlier view, current Music Director Manfred Honeck called the company “one of the world’s finest orchestras.”

The long-lived PSO makes its home in an equally historic venue. Converted from an opulent movie palace in 1971, when Americans swore off movies in favor of high culture, Heinz Hall proves itself an exceptional music venue. Fine acoustics please ears, while eyes take in glittering chandeliers and glints of gold leaf.

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra was founded in 1896, and its reputation was as big as its sound right from the start. Andrew Carnegie was an early backer, and reportedly claimed that it was the best orchestra in the country. More than a century later, it still enjoys its status as a nationally renowned organization. And the PSO continues to take pride in its acclaim—perhaps expanding on Carnegie's earlier view, current Music Director Manfred Honeck called the company "one of the world's finest orchestras."

The long-lived PSO makes its home in an equally historic venue. Converted from an opulent movie palace in 1971, when Americans swore off movies in favor of high culture, Heinz Hall proves itself an exceptional music venue. Fine acoustics please the ears, while eyes take in glittering chandeliers and glints of gold leaf.

Merchant Location Map
  1. 1

    Heinz Hall for the Performing Arts

    600 Penn Ave.

    Pittsburgh, PA 15222

    +14123924900

    Get Directions

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