"Sibelius & Elgar"

Schermerhorn Symphony Center

Give as a Gift
Limited quantity available
Over 380 bought

In a Nutshell

Jean Sibelius's evocative Symphony No. 1 and a deeply romantic concerto from Edward Elgar with young violin virtuoso James Ehnes

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires Mar 28, 2014. Limit 8 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Email reservation to be made before noon on day of show. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Schermerhorn Symphony Center. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must redeem together to sit together. Discount reflects Nashville Symphony Orchestra's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. Doors open 1 hour before showtime. For ADA accommodations, call box office promptly upon receipt of voucher - availability is limited. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

The Deal

  • $19 for one ticket to the Nashville Symphony’s “Sibelius & Elgar” (up to a $69 value)
  • Where: Schermerhorn Symphony Center
  • Seating: orchestra
  • Door time: one hour before showtime
  • Ticket values include all fees.

Performance Options
* Thursday, March 27, at 7 p.m. * Friday, March 28, at 8 p.m. * Saturday, March 29, at 8 p.m. * Click here to view the seating chart.

The Program

This special program pairs works by two contemporaries who languished in the shadows during the mid-20th century, only to be revived with interest in more recent times. Young solo violinist James Ehnes brings his 1715 Stradivarius, his especially thoughtful playing style, and his experience playing with some of the world’s greatest symphony orchestras to the Elgar work. * Jean Sibelius—Symphony No. 1 in E minor: A crash of percussion follows the dramatic swells that open the great Finnish composer’s entry into the symphonic form. Later, a strummed harp evokes birdsong amid the dark crescendos and haunting pizzicato passages. * Edward Elgar—Concerto in B minor for Violin and Orchestra: Elgar published this lyrical piece with the mysterious inscription “Herein is enshrined the soul of…” Upon its debut, critic Ernest Newman reported that “human feeling so nervous and subtle as this had never before spoken in English orchestral or choral music.”

Schermerhorn Symphony Center

Even though it opened in 2006, Schermerhorn Symphony Center looks like it’s been a part of the landscape for centuries. That’s because the center, which is named for Nashville Symphony’s late maestro Kenneth Schermerhorn, took its design cues from famed European concert halls. Its classic appearance is enhanced by 30 soundproof windows, which allow natural sunlight or unnatural spaceship lights to stream in. A custom-built organ rings out through the hall, and a convertible seating design allows the hall to morph into a ballroom floor for cabaret shows or weddings.

Schermerhorn Symphony Center

Even though it opened in 2006, Schermerhorn Symphony Center looks like it's been a part of the landscape for centuries. That's because the center, which is named for Nashville Symphony's late maestro Kenneth Schermerhorn, took its design cues from famed European concert halls. Its classic appearance is enhanced by 30 soundproof windows, which allow natural sunlight or unnatural spaceship lights to stream in. A custom-built organ rings out through the hall, and a convertible seating design allows the hall to morph into a ballroom floor for cabaret shows or weddings.

Merchant Location Map
  1. 1

    Schermerhorn Symphony Center

    1 Symphony Pl.

    Nashville, TN 37201

    +16156876400

    Get Directions

By purchasing this deal you'll unlock points which can be spent on discounts and rewards. Every 5,000 points can be redeemed for $5 Off your next purchase.
{"bucketedExperimentData":{"experiments":{},"dealData":{"page_type":"local"}}}