Nashville Symphony Performs Sibelius & Saint-Saëns at 8 p.m. on November 20 or 21

Schermerhorn Symphony Center

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In a Nutshell

Giancarlo Guerrero and the Nashville Symphony celebrate Finland’s greatest composer and evoke images of Egypt in Saint-Saëns’ Piano Concerto

The Fine Print

Expiration varies. Limit 8/person. Valid only for option purchased. Reservation recommended, or redeem day of show for a ticket at venue box office. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must purchase together to sit together. Discount reflects merchant's current ticket prices, which may change. ADA seating cannot be guaranteed. Contact box office prior to purchase for availability. Ticket value includes all fees. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

The Deal

  • $19 for one ticket for seating in the front orchestra or front balcony (up to $49 value)
  • Click to view the seating chart
  • A Classical Conversation takes place one hour before the show in the balcony lobby

Sibelius & Saint-Saëns

  • Danielpour—Toward the Splendid City (Live Recording): Building on its frequent collaboration with the American composer, the Nashville Symphony will record a live rendition of this intimate portrait of New York City—rife as it is with nostalgia and conflict.
  • Saint-Saëns—Piano Concerto No. 5: Camille Saint-Saëns’s final piano concerto, commonly known as The Egyptian, evokes scenes of towering pyramids and flowing Nile waters while borrowing heavily from Javanese and Middle Eastern music. That’s hardly a surprise, though, considering the composer frequently vacationed in Egypt and in fact penned the piece while staying at the temple town of Luxor.
  • Sibelius—Symphony No. 2: This four-movement piece by the renowned Finnish composer has turned heads due to more than just its dramatic finale—many believe it was written as a call for Finland’s independence from Russia. Even though Sibelius himself never confirmed that, the work still has become so connected with the country’s struggle for independence that it is popularly called the Symphony of Independence.

Schermerhorn Symphony Center

Even though it opened in 2006, Schermerhorn Symphony Center looks like it's been a part of the landscape for centuries. That's because the center, which is named for Nashville Symphony's late maestro Kenneth Schermerhorn, took its design cues from famed European concert halls. Its classic appearance is enhanced by 30 soundproof windows, which allow natural sunlight or unnatural spaceship lights to stream in. A custom-built organ rings out through the hall, and a convertible seating design allows the hall to morph into a ballroom floor for cabaret shows or weddings.

Merchant Location Map
  1. 1

    Schermerhorn Symphony Center

    1 Symphony Pl.

    Nashville, TN 37201

    +16156876400

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