New World Symphony's Bear Roars: Music in a Century of Russian Turmoil on Friday, February 27 (Up to 52% Off)

New World Center

Give as a Gift
Limited quantity available
Over 230 bought

In a Nutshell

Shostakovich’s wit and Tchaikovsky’s patriotism are on fully display in showcase of their wartime work

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires Feb 27, 2015. Limit 8/person. Redeem on 2/27 for a ticket at venue box office. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at venue. Refundable only on day of purchase. Discount reflects New World Symphony's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of event. Doors open 1hr before show. For ADA seating, call box office promptly on receipt of voucher-availability limited. Must be 21+ w/ ID for alcohol. Must use promo value in 1 visit. Though New World Center will try to accommodate all group sizes, General Admission holds no guarantee of all seats being together. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

The Deal

  • $15 for one ticket to see New World Symphony’s The Bear Roars: Music in a Century of Russian Turmoil hosted by Jamie Bernstein (up to $31 value)
  • Includes complimentary cocktail reception
  • When: Friday, February 27, at 7:30 p.m.
  • Where: New World Center
  • General admission
  • Door time: 6:30 p.m.
  • Ticket values include all fees
  • Click here to view the seating chart

The Bear Roars: Music in a Century of Russian Turmoil

  • Tchaikovsky—Marche Slave: This fiercely patriotic march was commissioned during a war between Serbia and the Ottoman Empire, and shows Russia’s support for the Serbian cause by deftly interweaving folk songs and the national anthem “God Save the Tsar.”
  • Shostakovich—Movement 3 from Symphony No. 8 in C minor: Pulsing suspense characterizes the third of five movements in this symphony, which is one of the composer’s three wartime symphonies and, like his others, is tinted by his wit and sarcasm. In this movement, that sarcasm is expressed largely through the throbbing of the trumpets, whose circus-esque feel comments on the masterwork’s roiling spiral of tension.
  • Shostakovich—Movement 4 from Symphony No. 5 in D minor: The standing ovation that followed the premiere of Symphony No. 5 went on for more than half an hour—almost as long as the 45-minute masterwork itself. Such a response was huge for Shostakovich, who was under pressure to conform to socialist realism despite its relative simplicity compared to his other works. His solution was subtle mockery in the vein of Mahler—outwardly meeting party expectations while maintaining his dignity.

New World Symphony

Most people would feel spread thin if they were running orchestras on both sides of the country. But most people aren't Michael Tilson Thomas. One of America's most famous conductors, composers, and tuxedo-wearers, Tilson Thomas has remained the artistic director of the New World Symphony since he founded it in 1987, even after becoming musical director of the San Francisco Symphony in 1995. This is because the Miami-based orchestra feeds a need for Tilson Thomas: that of remaining at the forefront of symphonic trends, in a laboratory where top musical graduates can explore performance and compositional opportunities. But new works from students and professionals aren't the only thing on the New World Symphony's docket—every year, ticket-holders can expect a thrilling lineup of the classical masters who built the genre.

Merchant Location Map
  1. 1

    New World Center

    500 17th St.

    Miami Beach, FL 33139

    +13056733331

    Get Directions

By purchasing this deal you'll unlock points which can be spent on discounts and rewards. Every 5,000 points can be redeemed for $5 Off your next purchase.
{}