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Pearl Harbor Divers - Ala Moana - Kakaako

Snorkeling Tour for Two or Four, or Private Snorkeling Tour for Eight from Pearl Harbor Divers (Up to 61% Off)

The Fine Print

Questions and Answers 3 questions

Q:

Hi, please advise how booked out you are as I will only be Hawaii from the 29th April until 3 rd May. Do you think there's availability for me to make use of this deal in that time frame? Also I'm a beginners swimmer is that ok? Thank you. Cheers

Viviann t.  asked on  Apr 25, 2013

A:

Please contact Pearl Harbor Divers at (808) 589-2177 for more information regarding reservation availability.

Christina B.  from  Groupon  replied on  Apr 25, 2013

A:

Yes we have a tour with availability on the 29th only. If you would like to book for that day, please contact our shop at 808-589-2177 M-F 9-6 and Sat/Sun 8-4 Hawaiian Time.

Patrick P.  from  Merchant  replied on  Apr 26, 2013

Q:

Do you need to know how to swim in order to go snorkeling?

Angela L.  asked on  Apr 23, 2013

A:

Yes. If you read the "Fine Print" section it clearly states you must be able to swim. Mahalo!

Patrick P.  from  Merchant  replied on  Apr 23, 2013

Q:

How often do you run into sharks? And are there any precautions to prevent attacks?

meg m.  asked on  Apr 22, 2013

A:

Aloha! Remember, this is the ocean we are diving in and there are always sharks present, whether we see them or not. The most common shark in Hawaii is the white tip reef shark and poses no threat to humans. You would basically have to stick your hand in its mouth to get it to bite you. They are skittish and when we are lucky enough to see them, they usually exit the area in a hurry. The larger, predatory sharks usually hunt at night so during the day they are in deep water. To prevent shark attacks from large, aggressive sharks: 1) don't have dying, bleeding fish that you have speared/caught anywhere near you while you are in the water 2) don't be in areas known to be feeding grounds for sharks during the early morning (before sunrise) or dusk hours 3) don't go in the water at all Realistically, sharks and humans rarely interact and when we are fortunate enough to see them, they are usually being curious to see what we are and if we have any food for them. If not, they leave. Humans are not part of the sharks' food chain and in most cases, people have been bitten by sharks by accident - mistaken for seals or turtles which ARE part of the sharks' food chain. Surfers on surfboards look like a seal or a turtle when viewed from below. In most cases, sharks went after the lone surfer/swimmer because they prefer to hunt single prey versus a group of prey. They know instinctively their chance of being injured by a group is greater than from a single prey. To date, we have seen one shark on these tours, a white tip reef shark. Hope this helps! Patrick

Patrick P.  from  Merchant  replied on  Apr 23, 2013

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