$150 for Portable Inflatable Planetarium Presentation from Portable Planetarium Presentations ($300 Value)

Tucson

$150
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In a Nutshell

Planetary enthusiast brings the stars down to Earth in an interactive, exciting experience for everyone involved

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires 120 days after purchase. Amount paid never expires. May be repurchased every 90 days. Valid only within 30 miles of zip code 85716. Reservation required. Merchant's standard cancellation policy applies (any fees not to exceed Groupon price). Limit 1 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Planetarium must be used indoors, and only one normal power outlet. Two sizes to choose from (small or large) depending on school needs; small planetarium seats up to 20 students and requires 8-foot ceiling height; large planetarium seats up to 45 students and requires 12-foot ceiling height. Additional fees apply for redemption beyond the service area Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

The Deal

  • $150 for a portable, inflatable planetarium presentation ($300 value)

Celestial Navigation: Finding the North Star and Using It

Aside from building a fire by snapping your fingers, nothing will impress your fellow explorers like reading the stars. Check out Groupon’s study of celestial navigation.

Explorers need only two things to determine their direction while boating or backpacking without a map or a compass: a basic knowledge of how the Big Dipper looks, and a flexible neck. The key in the Northern Hemisphere is finding Polaris, also known as the North Star. To start, look directly up and locate the collection of stars that resemble a rectangular basin with a handle sticking out of its upper-left corner. This is the Big Dipper. Next, crane your neck until your shoulders feel really good, and notice the bright star hovering above the Big Dipper’s upper right-hand corner. This is Polaris. From any position in the Northern Hemisphere, Polaris leads north. Alternatively, those in the Southern Hemisphere can use the Southern Cross constellation to determine which direction leads toward the South Pole.

When looking at the sky, an explorer should keep in mind that these constellations don’t always appear right-side up, depending on the position of the Earth and the amount he or she drank at margarita night. As such, it might require some twisting and turning to properly orient to the correct view.

Customer Reviews

Easy, amazing and educational! The kids loved it and we're talking about what they learned for days! Highly recommended!👍🏼👍🏼
Erin S. · August 13, 2016

Stay active indoors when the sky turns gray
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