Entry for One or Two in Commonwealth Sports Medicine Pink Power Triathlon on Sunday, August 16 (Up to 48%Off)

Value Discount You Save
$95 48% $46
Give as a Gift
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In a Nutshell

The chip-timed race starts with a 400 meter swim, followed by 11.4 miles of biking and a 5k run; each participant gets a hot pink race shirt

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires Aug 13, 2015. Amount paid never expires. Must reserve by 08/13/15. Limit 1 per person, may buy 1 additional as gift. Valid only for option purchased. All goods or services must be used by the same person. Purchase of the Groupon does not constitute registration in the event. Athletes must register online at the link below. The registration fees below do not include online processing charges or the $12 USAT one day insurance fee. All participants must have a USAT membership license or must purchase a $12 one day USAT insurance policy (must be purchased when registering online). Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Choose Between Two Options

  • $49 for entry for one in the Commonwealth Sports Medicine Pink Power Triathlon ($95 value)
  • $99 for entry for two in the Commonwealth Sports Medicine Pink Power Triathalon ($190 value)

At 7 a.m. on Sunday, August 16, racers begin their journey: a 400-meter swim in any style, an 11.4-mile bike ride, and a 5k run. That might not be a full-sized triathlon, but it’s not completely casual, either. The race is chip-timed, and culminates in medals for the fastest participants. As they’re awarded, all the participants snack on a spread of bagels, fruit, cookies, and pizza.

Each race entry includes a Pink Power finisher medal, a hot pink race shirt, and a commemorative race swim cap.

Water Ways: The Basic Swim Strokes

There are many ways to approach the swim portion of the triathlon. Read on to learn more about the most common swimming strokes.

Front crawl: starting face-down, swimmers alternate their arms as they reach forward in the water. Between strokes, the head turns to either side to inhale, and exhales as it turns back into the water. Since breathing can slow swimmers down, good breathing technique is key in competition.

Freestyle: in competitive swimming, the freestyle competition is technically a free-for-all; racers can swim whatever stroke they want. But most choose the front crawl, which has caused the two terms to become generally synonymous.

Backstroke: as swimmers lay on their backs, the arms alternate in a rotating motion, rising out of the water, over the head, and back down again.

Flutter kick: keeping the legs relatively straight with a slight bend at the knee, swimmers alternate their feet up and down. The flutter kick is used in the front crawl as well as the backstroke.

Breaststroke: this stroke begins with the head above water. The arms extend forward and dig into the water, propelling swimmers’ heads below the surface. As the arms scoop around the sides and come back to the swimmers’ chests, their heads will pop back up out of the water. Unlike the front crawl, the breaststroke employs the whip kick, in which the legs kick out in a circular motion similar to frogs.

Butterfly: starting face-down with their arms at their sides, swimmers bring their arms together up out of the water and above their heads. In this stroke, the legs must stay together at all times, kicking as if they were a dolphin’s flukes fanning a hot fish. During competition, accidentally breaking into a flutter or whip kick results in disqualification.


By purchasing this deal you'll unlock points which can be spent on discounts and rewards. Every 5,000 points can be redeemed for $5 Off your next purchase.
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