History-Museum Visit with “Ambrose” Lightship Tour for Two or Four at South Street Seaport Museum (Up to 60% Off)

Downtown

89 Ratings

Value Discount You Save
$20 55% $11
Give as a Gift
Limited quantity available
Over 550 bought

In a Nutshell

Newly renovated museum explores the seaport’s past and present with a historically authentic fleet and tour of "Ambrose" lightship

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires Oct 31, 2012. Amount paid never expires. Limit 3 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Museums instill wonder in children who have become bored with their own closets full of skeletons. Discover a body of knowledge with this Groupon.

Choose Between Two Options

  • $9 for general admission for two to the South Street Seaport Museum, including admission to the lightship Ambrose (up to a $20 value)
  • $16 for the above outing for four (up to a $40 value)<p>

Admission is free for museum members and children younger than 9 years old.

Visitors to the South Street Seaport Museum’s newly opened three-story exhibition galleries can expect a century-spanning look at New York’s waterways, industry, and cultural development from precolonial times to the present day. Current exhibits include Mannahatta: Manhattan in 1609—which recreates the island as it was before Henry Hudson sailed up the river that intriguingly bore his name—and Made in New York, which profiles six contemporary fashion and furniture designers in workshops around the city.

General admission to the museum includes an onboard tour of the lightship Ambrose, a living relic that guided ships through the bay’s treacherous sand bars and shoals from 1908 to 1932. In 1921 the craft was the first lightship equipped with a radio beacon, letting sailors more easily navigate the channel and catch the Morning Zoo on their ride to work. Ambrose was given to the museum by the US Coast Guard in 1968, and today she boasts a shiny new hull and authentically refurbished radio shack. Many of the museum’s regularly scheduled readings and tours are also free with admission, including guided journeys through Compass: Folk Art in Four Directions every Wednesday at 1 p.m.<p>

South Street Seaport Museum

New York City has her bustling waterways to thank for a rich history of art, industry, and cultural development—perhaps more than any other factor. The sea carried in a stream of tens of millions of immigrants and fueled the industrial age in one of the country’s most accessible portals to the world. South Street Seaport Museum’s massive gallery space in Schermerhorn Row Block pays tribute to a bygone age while bridging it to the city’s modern aquatic-shipping and transport industry. Some exhibits illuminate the past, such as the pseudo-marketplace at Coffee, Fish, and the Tattooed Man and the immaculately preserved hotel at Remains of the Stay, while others highlight modern issues such as the Occupy Wall Street movement.

Weighted with history, the museum’s fleet of tugboats, schooners, and sloops stays stalwartly afloat, each with its own story to tell; built in 1885, the Wavertree was one of the last wrought-iron sailing ships commissioned, and the Pioneer has spent more than 120 years feeding the economy with boatloads of lumber, stone, brick, oyster shells, and tourists.

South Street Seaport Museum

New York City has her bustling waterways to thank for a rich history of art, industry, and cultural development—perhaps more than any other factor. The sea carried in a stream of tens of millions of immigrants and fueled the industrial age in one of the country’s most accessible portals to the world. South Street Seaport Museum’s massive gallery space in Schermerhorn Row Block pays tribute to a bygone age while bridging it to the city’s modern aquatic-shipping and transport industry. Some exhibits illuminate the past, such as the pseudo-marketplace at Coffee, Fish, and the Tattooed Man and the immaculately preserved hotel at Remains of the Stay, while others highlight modern issues such as the Occupy Wall Street movement.

Weighted with history, the museum’s fleet of tugboats, schooners, and sloops stays stalwartly afloat, each with its own story to tell; built in 1885, the Wavertree was one of the last wrought-iron sailing ships commissioned, and the Pioneer has spent more than 120 years feeding the economy with boatloads of lumber, stone, brick, oyster shells, and tourists. The majestic four-masted bark Peking represents the famous German Flying P-Liners, designed to be crewed entirely by birds.

Customer Reviews

89 Ratings

I enjoyed it because it was something different to do with my son.
Christine S. · November 25, 2012
Great history lessons.
H R. · October 26, 2012
very neatly arranged. they have rotating exhibits. I especially liked the folk art exhibit and the way that they renovated their old structure, exposing some of the more interesting elements.
Christi D. · October 24, 2012
Merchant Location Map
  1. 1

    Downtown

    12 Fulton Street

    Manhattan, New York 10038

    212-748-8600

    Get Directions

Urbane activities, from museums to historical tours
15% Bonus Savings
Get an extra 15% off local restaurants, spas, salons, and more to use within 48 hours of your Goods order! See details
By purchasing this deal you'll unlock points which can be spent on discounts and rewards. Every 5,000 points can be redeemed for $5 Off your next purchase.
{}