$40 for a Four-Week Beginner Dance Course (Normally $85)

New York City

16 Ratings

Value Discount You Save
$85 53% $45
Give as a Gift
Limited quantity available
Over 210 bought

In a Nutshell

  • One of the largest, most diverse, and friendliest partner dance schools in New York
  • Huge variety of Latin and ballroom dances

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires Oct 1, 2009. Amount paid never expires. Valid for new guests only 1 per person May purchase multiple as gifts Must call to register Not valid with other offers Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

_Jump to: Reviews Should I Take a Dance Class?_

With today’s Groupon, a four-week dance course at Stepping Out Studios costs a mere $40—that’s 53% off an $85 value! Located at 37 W. 26th St., Stepping Out, famous for inspiring the wildly popular dance song of the same name, will teach you how to waltz, samba, swing, and more in four one-hour group classes. It’s a great way to spend quality time with your significant other or learn a skill that a small majority of Americans call “pretty fun.”

Thanks to television’s Dancing with the Stars, partner dancing has once again become a pop-culture phenomenon. Don’t miss out on the craze this time around—head over to Stepping Out and take one of the following classes:

  • West Coast Swing: Spin and twirl your partner in this dance derived from the Lindy Hop.
  • Salsa Classic & Merengue: These Latin dances will have you shaking your hips.
  • Argentine Tango: Seduce your partner in this tense dance.
  • Rumba & Cha Cha: These Cuban dances are sensual and energy-filled.
  • Much more, such as the hustle, foxtrot, waltz, wave, rusty sprinkler, prancing pony, and honey-baked ham.

Stepping Out’s weekly classes build on each other, so good attendance is critical if you want to improve. Check out the full class schedule and pick from any beginner course (courses with codes ending in s).

Reviews

People who love dancing also love Stepping Out. Read what they have to say:

  • A GREAT school for ballroom dancing! So many different styles to choose from… having a blast in all of the classes I’ve taken! The staff is great, very professional and well-versed in dance… – Erica L., Yelp
  • For people who just want to have some fun learning how to dance!!!! The staff is awesome- fun, laid-back, welcoming. – N W, Yelp
  • My husband and I started coming to Stepping Out in May, 2006, to learn a First Dance for our wedding. We called around but opted for Stepping Out. They seemed the most friendly and professional. We danced a beautiful Rumba, and everyone at our reception loved it. We never thought we would, but we wound up loving social dancing in general and came back for lessons after our wedding. It not only gives us something to do and grow with together, but it gives each of us a sense of enjoyment and accomplishment. I really think we are lifetime converts. – Jill Paulsson and Craig Ludovick, Stepping Out website

Should I Take a Dance Class?

Most people know this is a great deal. But maybe you’re one of those skeptics who thinks that college was a waste of money and believes anyone can learn anything just by reading books. We don’t want you to waste your money, so we’ve gone the extra mile to make it easier for you to determine if you can learn to dance from the written word. We’ve painstakingly transcribed the following information about dance from Wikipedia. After reading this, contact our customer service department for a 60-minute, 200-question test that will determine if the text effectively taught you dance.

Dance (from French danser, perhaps from Frankish) is a sport and art form that generally refers to movement of the body, usually rhythmic and to music, used as a form of expression, social interaction or presented in a spiritual or performance setting.

Dance may also to [sic] regarded as a form of nonverbal communication between humans, and is also performed by other animals (bee dance, patterns of behaviour such as a mating dance). Gymnastics, figure skating and synchronized swimming are sports dance disciplines, while martial arts kata are often compared to dances. Motion in inanimate objects may also be described as dances (the leaves danced in the wind), and certain musical forms or genres.

Definitions of what constitutes dance are dependent on social, cultural, aesthetic, artistic and moral constraints and range from functional movement (such as folk dance) to virtuoso techniques such as ballet. Dance can be participatory, social or performed for an audience. It can also be ceremonial, competitive or erotic. Dance movements may be without significance in themselves, such as in ballet or European folk dance, or have a gestural vocabulary/symbolic system as in many Asian dances. Dance can embody or express ideas, emotions or tell a story.

Dancing has evolved many styles. Breakdancing and Krumping are related to the hip hop culture. African dance is interpretive. Ballet, Ballroom, Waltz, and Tango are classical styles of dance while Square and the Electric Slide are forms of step dances.

Every dance, no matter what style, has something in common. It not only involves flexibility and body movement, but also physics. If the proper physics is not taken into consideration, injuries may occur.

Choreography is the art of creating dances. The person who creates (i.e., choreographs) a dance is known as the choreographer.

Origins and history of dance

Eighteenth century social dance. Translated caption: A cheerful dance awakens love and feeds hope with lively joy, (Florence, 1790).

Dance does not leave behind clearly identifiable physical artifacts such as stone tools, hunting implements or cave paintings. It is not possible to say when dance became part of human culture. Dance has certainly been an important part of ceremony, rituals, celebrations and entertainment since before the birth of the earliest human civilizations. Archeology delivers traces of dance from prehistoric times such as the 9,000 year old Rock Shelters of Bhimbetka paintings in India and Egyptian tomb paintings depicting dancing figures from circa 3300 BC.

One of the earliest structured uses of dances may have been in the performance and in the telling of myths. It was also sometimes used to show feelings for one of the opposite gender. It is also linked to the origin of “love making.” Before the production of written languages, dance was one of the methods of passing these stories down from generation to generation.

Another early use of dance may have been as a precursor to ecstatic trance states in healing rituals. Dance is still used for this purpose by many cultures from the Brazilian rainforest to the Kalahari Desert.

Sri Lankan dances goes back to the mythological times of aboriginal yingyang twins and “yakkas” (devils). According to a Sinhalese legend, Kandyan dances originate, 250 years ago, from a magic ritual that broke the spell on a bewitched king. Many contemporary dance forms can be traced back to historical, traditional, ceremonial, and ethnic dance.

Dance classification and genres

Dance categories by number of interacting dancers are mainly solo dance, partner dance and group dance. Dance is performed for various purposes like ceremonial dance, erotic dance, performance dance, social dance etc.

Dancing and music

Many early forms of music and dance were created and performed together. This paired development has continued through the ages with dance/music forms such as: jig, waltz, tango, disco, salsa, electronica and hip-hop. Some musical genres also have a parallel dance form such as baroque music and baroque dance whereas others developed separately: classical music and classical ballet.

Although dance is often accompanied by music, it can also be presented independently or provide its own accompaniment (tap dance). Dance presented with music may or may not be performed in time to the music depending on the style of dance. Dance performed without music is said to be danced to its own rhythm.

Ballroom dancing is an art although it may incorporates many fitness components using an artistic state of mind.

Dance studies and techniques

In the early 1920s, dance studies (dance practice, critical theory, Musical analysis and history) began to be considered an academic discipline. Today these studies are an integral part of many universities’ arts and humanities programs. By the late 20th century the recognition of practical knowledge as equal to academic knowledge lead to the emergence of practice research and practice as research. A large range of dance courses are available including:

Professional practice: performance and technical skills Practice research: choreography and performance Ethnochoreology, encompassing the dance-related aspects of anthropology, cultural studies, gender studies, area studies, postcolonial theory, ethnography, etc. Dance therapy or dance-movement therapy. Dance and technology: new media and performance technologies. Laban Movement Analysis and somatic studies Academic degrees are available from BA (Hons) to PhD and other postdoctoral fellowships, with some dance scholars taking up their studies as mature students after a professional dance career.

Dance competitions

An amateur dancesport competition at MIT.

A dance competition is an organized event in which contestants perform dances before a judge or judges for awards and, in some cases, monetary prizes. There are several major types of dance competitions, distinguished primarily by the style or styles of dances performed. Major types of dance competitions include:

Competitive dance, in which a variety of theater dance styles—such as acro, ballet, jazz, hip-hop, lyrical, and tap—are permitted. Open competitions, which permit a wide variety of dance styles. A popular example of this is the TV program So You Think You Can Dance. Dancesport, which is focused exclusively on ballroom and latin dance. Popular examples of this are TV programs Dancing with the Stars and Strictly Come Dancing. Single-style competitions, such as highland dance, dance team, and Irish dance, which only permit a single dance style.

Today, there are various dances and dance show competitions on Television and the Internet.

Dance occupations

There are different careers connected with dancing: Dancer, dance teacher, dance sport coach, dance therapist and choreographer. Dancer

Dance training differs depending on the dance form. There are university programs and schools associated with professional dance companies for specialised training in classical dance (e.g. Ballet) and modern dance. There are also smaller, privately owned dance studios where students may train in a variety of dance forms including competitive dance forms (e.g. Latin dance, ballroom dance, etc.) as well as ethnic/traditional dance forms.

Professional dancers at the Tropicana Club, Havana, Cuba, in 2008

Professional dancers are usually employed on contract or for particular performances/productions. The professional life of a dancer is generally one of constantly changing work situations, strong competition pressure and low pay. Professional dancers often need to supplement their income, either in dance related roles (e.g., dance teaching, dance sport coaches, yoga) or Pilates instruction to achieve financial stability. In the U.S. many professional dancers are members of unions such as the American Guild of Musical Artists, the Screen Actors Guild and Actors’ Equity Association. The unions help determine working conditions and minimum salaries for their members.

Dance teachers

Dance teacher and operators of dance schools rely on reputation and marketing. For dance forms without an association structure such as Salsa or Tango Argentino they may not have formal training. Most dance teachers are self employed. Dancesport coaches

Dancesport coaches are tournament dancers or former dancesports people, and may be recognised by a dance sport federation. Choreographer Choreographers are generally university trained and are typically employed for particular projects or, more rarely may work on contract as the resident choreographer for a specific dance company. A choreographic work is protected intellectual property. Dancers may undertake their own choreography.

Dance in South Asia

India During the first millennium BCE in India, many texts were composed which attempted to codify aspects of daily life. In the matter of dance, Bharata Muni’s Natyashastra (literally “the text of dramaturgy”) is the one of the earlier texts. Though the main theme of Natyashastra deals with drama, dance is also widely featured, and indeed the two concepts have ever since been linked in Indian culture. The text elaborates various hand-gestures or mudras and classifies movements of the various limbs of the body, gait, and so on. The Natyashastra categorised dance into four groups and into four regional varieties, naming the groups: secular, ritual, abstract, and, interpretive. However, concepts of regional geography has altered and so have regional varieties of Indian dances. Dances like “Odra Magadhi”, which after decades long debate, has been traced to present day Mithila-Orissa region’s dance form of Odissi, indicate influence of dances in cultural interactions between different regions.[4] From these beginnings rose the various classical styles which are recognised today. Therefore, all Indian classical dances are to varying degrees rooted in the Natyashastra and therefore share common features: for example, the mudras, some body positions, and the inclusion of dramatic or expressive acting or abhinaya. The Indian classical music tradition provides the accompaniment for the dance, and as percussion is such an integral part of the tradition, the dancers of nearly all the styles wear bells around their ankles to counterpoint and complement the percussion.

Bhangra in the Punjab The Punjab area overlapping India and Pakistan is the place of origin of Bhangra. It is widely known both as a style of music and a dance. It is mostly related to ancient harvest celebrations, love, patriotism or social issues. Its music is coordinated by a musical instrument called the ‘Dhol’. Bhangra is not just music but a dance, a celebration of the harvest where people beat the dhol (drum), sing Boliyaan (lyrics) and dance.It developed further with the Vaisakhi festival of the Sikhs.

Dances of Sri Lanka The devil dances of Sri Lanka or “yakun natima” are a carefully crafted ritual with a history reaching far back into Sri Lanka’s pre-Buddhist past. It combines ancient “Ayurvedic” concepts of disease causation with psychological manipulation. The dance combines many aspects including Sinhalese cosmology, the dances also has an impact on the classical dances of Sri Lanka.[5]

In Europe and North America

Ballet

Ballet developed first in Italy and then in France from lavish court spectacles that combined music, drama, poetry, song, costumes and dance. Members of the court nobility took part as performers. During the reign of Louis XIV, himself a dancer, dance became more codified. Professional dancers began to take the place of court amateurs, and ballet masters were licensed by the French government. The first ballet dance academy was the Académie Royale de Danse (Royal Dance Academy), opened in Paris in 1661. Shortly thereafter, the first institutionalized ballet troupe, associated with the Academy, was formed; this troupe began as an all-male ensemble but by 1681 opened to include women as well.

20th century concert dance

At the beginning of the 20th century, there was an explosion of innovation in dance style characterized by an exploration of freer technique. Early pioneers of what became known as modern dance include Loie Fuller, Isadora Duncan, Mary Wigman and Ruth St. Denis. The relationship of music to dance serves as the basis for Eurhythmics, devised by Emile Jaques-Dalcroze, which was influential to the development of Modern dance and modern ballet through artists such as Marie Rambert. Eurythmy, developed by Rudolf Steiner and Marie Steiner-von Sivers, combines formal elements reminiscent of traditional dance with the new freer style, and introduced a complex new vocabulary to dance. In the 1920s, important founders of the new style such as Martha Graham and Doris Humphrey began their work. Since this time, a wide variety of dance styles have been developed; see Modern dance.

The influence of African American dance

African American dances are those dances which have developed within African American communities in everyday spaces, rather than in dance studios, schools or companies and its derivatives, tap dance, disco, jazz dance, swing dance, hip hop dance and breakdance. Other dances, such as the lindy hop with its relationship to rock and roll music and rock and roll dance have also had a global influence.

Stepping Out Studios

Stepping Out Studios owner George Qiao carries on Stepping Out Studio's tradition of teaching partner dances such argentine tango, swing, salsa, hustle, and country western to all levels and backgrounds, with a team of experienced instructors on staff. Stepping Out's staff roster is comprised of competitors who’ve graced the stages of TV programs such as the Today Show, Dancing with the Stars, and numerous off-Broadway productions.

The teachers also stay connected to the local dance community, so they can recommend local clubs to their students once they've mastered salsa and merengue at four-week Crash Courses or the smooth-steps of the foxtrot at group classes. But students don’t have to go far to show off their skills—the studio hosts dance parties almost every day.

Customer Reviews

16 Ratings

Nelson Flores, of Salsa Academy, is great. He is professional, an expert dancer and instructor, humorous, and patient.
Linda B. · December 23, 2015
Nice friendly dance studios for beginners.
Susan R. · February 5, 2015

15% Bonus Savings
Get an extra 15% off local restaurants, spas, salons, and more to use within 48 hours of your Goods order! See details
By purchasing this deal you'll unlock points which can be spent on discounts and rewards. Every 5,000 points can be redeemed for $5 Off your next purchase.
{}