Sightseeing in Tucson


Select Local Merchants

  • Arizona Historical Society
    There’s little left in Tucson to suggest that back in the mid-19th-century the city served as the Southwest’s hub for highway robbers. But it's a fact that the area hosted a string of stagecoach holdups and served as the starting point for Wyatt Earp’s infamous vendetta ride. At the Arizona History Museum, relics stand testament to this harrowed past, including an original Concord stagecoach, not unlike those whose occupants were forced to surrender their valuables to roadside brigands. The museum doesn’t only explore infamy, though; it illuminates all the forces that took part in Tucson’s transition from Paleo-Indian hunting ground to Spanish colonial outpost to the commercial center it is today. Exhibits cover this vast span of time creatively, including a full-size replica of an underground mine that provides a glimpse into early-20th-century working conditions, hands-on exhibits that recall the day-to-day lives of Native Americans, and archaeology displays that detail the surrounding environment's history over the past 4,000 years.
    Read More
    949 E 2nd St
    Tucson, AZ US
  • Tohono Chul Park
    Tucson's Tohono Chul Park serves wonderfully aromatic teas and more. Can't eat gluten? Avoiding fatty foods? Vegan? No problem — Tohono Chul Park offers plenty of options for you as well. Drinks here are readily available, so you can enjoy a glass of red or try something new. Bring your whole brood to Tohono Chul Park, where families can dig in to tasty and kid-friendly fare together. During the summer months, don't miss out on Tohono Chul Park's outdoor patio seating. Throwing a big party? Count on Tohono Chul Park to provide top-notch catering with the same great dishes you love. Free parking is available right next door. You'll typically spend about $30 per person to dine at Tohono Chul Park, so plan your budget accordingly. The menu at Tohono Chul Park includes breakfast, lunch, and dinner — stop by for your favorite meal.
    Read More
    7366 N Paseo Del Norte
    Tucson, AZ US
  • Flandrau Science Center and Planetarium
    Located on the University of Arizona’s campus, the Flandrau Science Center and Planetarium opens the eyes of all ages to the scientific wonders of our planet, solar system, and universe. The center houses a mineral collection that dates back to 1892, and now holds more than 26,000 specimens including meteorites and minerals from Arizona, Mexico, and elsewhere in the world. They also feature exhibits such as an exploration of Arizona’s Sky Islands—mountains that rise above the desert basins and shelter myriad plants, birds, and animals. Other exhibits include Mars: Up Close and Personal, which features a scale model of the red planet’s surface.
    Read More
    1601 E University Blvd.
    Tucson, AZ US
  • Tucson Museum of Art
    A diverse array of evocative and provocative pieces adorn the hallowed halls at the Tucson Museum of Art, which has served up a sensory feast to art-hungry hominids for more than 85 years. Armed with a year-long membership, budding art archivists can light their Blackberry torches to explore the museum's cavernous archives of current and permanent exhibitions, eventually discovering the wormhole that thrusts them forward to upcoming exhibitions. More than 1,900 works representing approximately 2,000 years of pre-Columbian art populate the Art of Latin America collection, including some galleries hosted in the historic Stevens/Duffield House, and the Art of the American West collection showcases expressions of the regional landscape and cultures. Perched atop the former Presidio of San Agust?n del Tucson, the museum complex includes access to five restored historic homes donned in distinct styles that span centuries of architecture, d?cor, and La-Z-Boy upholstery.
    Read More
    140 N Main Ave
    Tucson, AZ US
  • Mini Time Machine
    This museum of pint-sized pieces showcases more than 275 miniature houses, room boxes, and other collectibles that are organized into three categories: Enchanted Realm, History and Antiques Gallery, and Exploring the World. Leave the girth of planet Earth and enter the whimsical fantasyland of a tiny-sized Enchanted Realm. Interactive exhibits allow you to search for an elusive fairy within the goblets of a sentient tree showpiece or unearth scattered woodland creatures, snow villages, fairy castles, and witch compounds. Teleport through the blue, arched rotunda to the History and Antiques Gallery, which chronicles the significance of miniature relics throughout history and displays one of the oldest mini houses in the United States, dating back to 1775. Travel the floor as a nephilim Magellan in the Exploring the World section, which surveys the cultural value of miniatures from other countries.
    Read More
    4455 E Cp
    Tucson, AZ US
  • Jewish History Museum
    The Jewish History Museum's mission is twofold: to teach visitors about Jewish heritage in the American Southwest and to preserve the site of Arizona's first synagogue. Visitors are invited to examine carefully curated exhibits inside this historical building. Eye Catcher: Through photos and stories, the Holocaust History Center honors the lives of survivors. Significant Artifacts: Among the prized artifacts is a pocket watch whose face is inscribed with Hebrew, a gift to Jewish soldiers during World War I. Also on display is an 1897 Mexican coin that was found in the synagogue's cornerstone. Don't Miss: Every January, the museum hosts an exhibit of ornate Ketubah and lavish vintage wedding dresses. One dress features beadwork so intricate that it weighs 42 pounds. Past Exhibits: Skullcaps and Shul Hats displayed collections of head coverings that included intricately designed shul hats and carefully woven yarmulkes from Afghanistan. The Building: Built in 1910 as a synagogue, it fell into disrepair after the congregation outgrew it; it was opened as a museum in 2008 and is today recognized as the first synagogue in Arizona. From the Press: "The museum specializes in found objects?amazing stuff that somehow made its way out of owners? hands and into this house of treasures." ? Zocalo Leave Your Mark: In keeping with the Jewish tradition of placing stones at grave sites as a sign of permanence, visitors are invited to leave one in the Holocaust Center as a tribute to the survivors.
    Read More
    564 South Stone Avenue
    Tucson, AZ US

Groupon Guide