Sleuth House

Welcome to Sleuth House by Gristle/Blenderman Games. This classic whodunit pits the young and young at heart against each other in a race to solve a grisly, upper-class killing. Thrill as you and your children eye the colorful suspects and wonder of what dark, horrific deeds they are capable. Laugh as you and your loved ones deduce the weapon used in the crime, be it an antique gun or the brutally inefficient golf cleats. It's spooky fun for kids aged 6 and up as they explore the perversely decadent palace of a now-dead socialite.

Bedroom

Sleuth House, the only murder-based board game that thought to include one of these rooms since 1947. This is a room where people sleep like the dead on their Sona Stop Snoring pillow with case. And with the nefarious characters skulking around this Sleuth House, they might never wake up.

Laboratory

Nothing evil has ever happened in a laboratory. Until now. Possibly. Depending on the outcome of the game. I just hope no blood got on the sciencetacular Molecule-R Cuisine R-Evolution molecular-gastronomy kit. That thing is to die for … literally? Maybe. Anything is possible in Sleuth House.

Disaffected-wealthy-person loafing parlor

One must have a room in which to drape oneself across a chaise lounge and one's arm across one's forehead and have a good sulk about the inadequate width of Papa's yacht. But even the most sullen debutante has no reason to sulk here after the short work that the Cerama Bryte cooktop cleaner kit makes of stove grease.

Creepy mounted-animal-head room

Oh man, a murder definitely probably happened here. Some Diamond Candles would certainly calm the violent-crime vibes emanating from this room.

Family room

A big, empty room with a family standing in it. Nobody knows or talks to this family. Maybe someone should hang up some Framed Art Masterpieces to give these people something to look at. Let's get out of this room.

Murdering room

No big, dusty Victorian mansion is complete without a classic MR. This one is particularly beautiful as it's full of toys and flowers.

Conservatorium

A mysterious room for a mysterious billionaire. Nobody knows what a conservatorium is for, but what they do know is that it could use some Maytex window curtains. But what they don't know is what this room is for, and whether a crime happened in it.

Hunting preserve

Hey, the animal heads have to come from somewhere. This room comes fully equipped with a menagerie of animals, realistic fauna, and wall-to-wall Safavieh indoor-outdoor rugs, so one can hunt game (even the most dangerous kind?) in comfort and style.

Planetarium

Sit down. Look up. See stars. Why wouldn't this be in a mansion? This room is best enjoyed with a soda from the SodaSparkle Super starter pack. Be careful because, as they say, "in amalgamations of space, no one can hear you scream."

Welcome to Sleuth House

by Gristle/Blenderman Games

This classic whodunit pits the young and young at heart against each other in a race to solve a grisly, upper-class killing. Thrill as you and your children eye the colorful suspects and wonder of what dark, horrific deeds they are capable. Laugh as you and your loved ones deduce the weapon used in the crime, be it an antique gun or the brutally inefficient golf cleats. It's spooky fun for kids aged 6 and up as they explore the perversely decadent palace of a now-dead socialite.

Aldous R. Blackenwhite

During the golden era of his silver-screen career, Aldous R. Blackenwhite gave a nation of people something to look at for a while over and over again. His career took off like an ocean liner when he starred in the classic mystery drama Rendezvous on Golden Lake (he was The Judge) and kept on rising into the sky with such released movies as The Porch of Great Men and Big Baby Island. Blackenwhite's many accolades include notes from fans and more. Sadly, his career ended when the invention of color movies revealed to the world that he was black and white in real life and not just in the outdated movie-recording medium. It, perhaps, drove him mad. Perhaps mad enough to kill.

Ginger St. Goldenrod

From the age of 13, Ginger has had the power to confuse men's minds using only her body language and her patented "Squiggle Walk." Known for her sturdy calves and handsome shoulders, Ginger attracts attention wherever she goes. She was engaged to a wealthy oil well—until it mysteriously caught fire. Now Ginger's back on the market.

Blade kite

Invented by a terrible man in China in 568 AD, this weapon is as hard to use as it is horrifyingly gory.

Sweet Baby Burgundy

Sweet Baby Burgundy is a baby at a crime scene.

Viceroy Violet

Viceroy Martim Afonso de Violet is a man out of time—literally. Appointed by His Majesty Filipe II in 1605, de Violet served as viceroy of Portuguese India, commanding the Portuguese navy in the Battle of Cape Rachado and fighting over the present-day Malaccan exclave of Tanjung Tuan in 1606. In 1607, while commanding a mission to recover then-precious ice from the southern tip of Sri Lanka, de Violet fell into a glacial crevasse and was flash-frozen—only to be awoken in 2009 by the sciences of our modern day. Some say the ice crystals permanently burst the brain cells in his mind's mercy and decency centers, and still others say he is, in his heart, a soldier, not a killer.

Rolled-up newspaper

With this morbid device, every page is the obituaries.

Mauvington P. Heliotrope, Esq.

Don't let his name or dandy vestments fool you. Mauvington is quick on his feet and handy with the array of weapons included in this board game. He is a middle manager for a company that makes bags that hold napkins, and his increasing ennui at being a faceless cog could manifest itself quite ... killfully.

The Widow Prune

The Widow Prune was voted Europe's Best Grandmother four times running. She would have gotten a fifth had the world not decided it wanted hipper, sexier, more-45-year-old grandmothers. She was left in the dust with no more trophies and no more grandkids, who imported a new grammy from Brazil. She learned a lot about poisons during the war, just saying.

Dr. Denim

Dr. Denim couldn't care less that he's the leading licroscopic surgeon in the country—he just wants to funk out. This fan of funky, down-home music has spent his whole life following bands such as Tommy and the Express Train to Good Times and The Big Bad Bridge Brigade. In fact, there's only one thing Dr. D loves more than soaking up some good-times tunes—and that's possibly committing murder.

Cleats

You can end a life with a pair of cleats. Try not to think about it.

Thomas Vermillion

Thomas's father took him to Paris when he was just 4 years old and bought him his first silk sports coat, and he hasn't looked back since. Though Thomas spends his days bleaching his imported woolen undergarments and kissing his decorative-button collection, one thing's for sure: being a clotheshorse can get expensive, and murder for hire might help feed his appetite for clothes oats.

The Plaid Man

No one knows who the Plaid Man is or where he came from—unless they have read this bio. The Plaid Man's real name is Peter Carmichael and he's from Duluth, Minnesota, where he works as a brand coordinator for Home Depot. His son recently gifted him an iPod Nano preloaded with the greatest hits of his favorite bands, R.E.M. and U2, so he can listen while doing yard work. If he leads such a typical life, why don such an enigmatic disguise? Probably because he's the murderer. I mean, that would make sense.

Double blunderbuss

All the sleek precision of the blunderbuss ... doubled.

Ben Frederickson

Ben is a very sad man who was not invited to the dinner party at which the horrible crime took place. Could he be the murderer? Well, he is one of the characters in the game, so yes perhaps.

Grouber