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Sightseeing in Green Valley


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  • Flandrau Science Center and Planetarium
    Located on the University of Arizona’s campus, the Flandrau Science Center and Planetarium opens the eyes of all ages to the scientific wonders of our planet, solar system, and universe. The center houses a mineral collection that dates back to 1892, and now holds more than 26,000 specimens including meteorites and minerals from Arizona, Mexico, and elsewhere in the world. They also feature exhibits such as an exploration of Arizona’s Sky Islands—mountains that rise above the desert basins and shelter myriad plants, birds, and animals. Other exhibits include Mars: Up Close and Personal, which features a scale model of the red planet’s surface.
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    1601 E University Blvd.
    Tucson, AZ US
  • Jewish History Museum
    The Jewish History Museum's mission is twofold: to teach visitors about Jewish heritage in the American Southwest and to preserve the site of Arizona's first synagogue. Visitors are invited to examine carefully curated exhibits inside this historical building. Eye Catcher: Through photos and stories, the Holocaust History Center honors the lives of survivors. Significant Artifacts: Among the prized artifacts is a pocket watch whose face is inscribed with Hebrew, a gift to Jewish soldiers during World War I. Also on display is an 1897 Mexican coin that was found in the synagogue's cornerstone. Don't Miss: Every January, the museum hosts an exhibit of ornate Ketubah and lavish vintage wedding dresses. One dress features beadwork so intricate that it weighs 42 pounds. Past Exhibits: Skullcaps and Shul Hats displayed collections of head coverings that included intricately designed shul hats and carefully woven yarmulkes from Afghanistan. The Building: Built in 1910 as a synagogue, it fell into disrepair after the congregation outgrew it; it was opened as a museum in 2008 and is today recognized as the first synagogue in Arizona. From the Press: "The museum specializes in found objects?amazing stuff that somehow made its way out of owners? hands and into this house of treasures." ? Zocalo Leave Your Mark: In keeping with the Jewish tradition of placing stones at grave sites as a sign of permanence, visitors are invited to leave one in the Holocaust Center as a tribute to the survivors.
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    564 South Stone Avenue
    Tucson, AZ US
  • The University of Arizona Museum of Art
    Scholarship and public engagement have remained equally vital parts of The University of Arizona Museum of Art's mission. By preserving collections that showcase five centuries of artistic expression from around the world, the museum promotes greater appreciation for the inherent value of the visual arts. The museum houses works by renowned artists such as Georgia O’Keeffe, Jackson Pollock, and Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun. Eye Catcher: 26 panels of Fernando Gallego and Maestro Bartolomé's 15th century altarpiece created for the Cathedral of Ciudad Rodrigo in Spain Don't Miss: "Green on Blue" by abstract expressionist Mark Rothko Hidden Gem: Plaster and clay models by Jacques Lipchitz. Also keep eyes peeled for actual tools from the Lipchitz's workshop, portrait busts, and finished sculptures Beyond the Gallery Walls: More than 40 public sculptures and integrated artworks speckle the surrounding area, providing small discoveries for visitors willing to explore the campus.
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    1031 N Olive Rd
    Tucson, AZ US
  • Children's Museum Tucson
    Children's Museum Tucson was built on the belief that learning should be fun. To that end, play is a key element in the museum's interactive exhibits. Each year, more than 144,000 people visit and learn something new. Size: a 17,000-square-foot facility with 13 permanent exhibits Eye Catcher: the giant body parts that move and make sounds inside Bodyology Permanent Mainstay: Investigation Station, which is filled with interactive activities devoted to physics, optics, math, and other sciences Don't Miss: Children explore various mediums and use recyclables to create their very own masterpieces in the art studio. What's Outdoors: a courtyard with a sand pit, a playhouse, a fountain, and sweet scents from the garden Pro Tip: Take younger visitors to Wee World, the museum area that's specifically designed for ages 4 and under. Special Programs: kids' exercises classes, educational programs, and summer camps
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    200 S 6th Ave
    Tucson, AZ US
  • Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter
    A small group of explorers stands beneath an open dome of night sky as pinpricks of starlight glitter against the expanse's dark blues and blacks. Each spot of light even seems to look much clearer from here—likely because the group is standing 9,157 feet above sea level. At the Stewart Observatory inside Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter at the mountain's summit, scientists guide visitors through the use of gear such as a 32-inch Schulman telescope—the state's largest public viewing telescope—to probe the far reaches of space to learn about celestial phenomena and take in magnified images of the universe just above. Days and nights at the center bring a slew of learning experiences to budding astronomers. Accompanied by University of Arizona scientists, Discovery Days lead explorations of topics such as tree rings, hummingbirds, and meteorology, frequently beckoning students into the surrounding outdoors. During nightly SkyNights programming, groups summit Mt. Lemmon for a five-hour evening of dining and stargazing at the observatory. One-on-one time with heavenly bodies comes courtesy of Astronomer Nights, wherein site staffers grant singles or pairs lodging, private access to the Schulman telescope, and the chance to contribute directly to the field upon discovering a supernova, nebula, or handlebar mustache on the man in the moon. Periodically, the scientific team also expounds on specific topics, such as digital celestial imaging, with the public in multiple-day workshops. Each participant builds on the Stewart Observatory's list of achievements since 1970, which include furthering infrared astronomy, surveying the moon for Apollo lunar landings, and searching for near-Earth asteroids.
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    933 North Cherry Avenue
    Tucson, AZ US
  • Arizona Historical Society
    There’s little left in Tucson to suggest that back in the mid-19th-century the city served as the Southwest’s hub for highway robbers. But it's a fact that the area hosted a string of stagecoach holdups and served as the starting point for Wyatt Earp’s infamous vendetta ride. At the Arizona History Museum, relics stand testament to this harrowed past, including an original Concord stagecoach, not unlike those whose occupants were forced to surrender their valuables to roadside brigands. The museum doesn’t only explore infamy, though; it illuminates all the forces that took part in Tucson’s transition from Paleo-Indian hunting ground to Spanish colonial outpost to the commercial center it is today. Exhibits cover this vast span of time creatively, including a full-size replica of an underground mine that provides a glimpse into early-20th-century working conditions, hands-on exhibits that recall the day-to-day lives of Native Americans, and archaeology displays that detail the surrounding environment's history over the past 4,000 years.
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    949 E 2nd St
    Tucson, AZ US

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