American Symphony Orchestra

Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall

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In a Nutshell

In this showcase of posthumous work, audiences are treated to pieces by Schubert, Buckner & Dvořák that not even the composers got to hear

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires Mar 26, 2015. Limit 8 per person. Valid only for option purchased. Redeem starting 3/26 for a ticket at venue box office. Must show valid ID matching name on Groupon at Carnegie Hall. Refundable only on day of purchase. Venue assigns seat location. Must redeem together to sit together. Discount reflects American Symphony Orchestra's current ticket prices-price may differ on day of the event. Doors open 30 minutes before conductor's note. For ADA seating, call box office promptly upon receipt of voucher - availability is limited. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

The Deal

  • One ticket to the American Symphony Orchestra’s Opus Posthumous
  • When: Thursday, March 26, at 8 p.m.
  • Where: Carnegie Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
  • Door time: 6:30 p.m.; a conductor Q&A begins at 7 p.m.
  • Full offer value includes ticketing fees

Seating Options

The Program

The three works all have one thing in common—they were never heard by their composers, at least not with a full orchestra. Maestro Leon Botstein leads a 30-minute talk on the strange stories behind each composition, which were all written early in the careers of their creators, but somehow never made it to the stage until decades after each had passed away.

  • Schubert—Overture from Claudine von Villa Bella: Although Franz Schubert wrote this meditative overture during a youthful flurry of productivity, the three-act opera it was meant to introduce was never performed. Even more unfortunate, the final two acts were burned for kindling 20 years after his death.
  • Bruckner—Symphony No. 00: As indicated by the title, Anton Bruckner never considered this composition to be a significant part of his career, dismissing it as “schoolwork.” He may have filed it away, but it was rediscovered nearly 27 years after his death, unveiled to the world in all its elegance and precision.
  • Dvořák—Symphony No. 1: Pulsing with emotive energy, Dvořák’s very first symphony was seemingly lost forever when he submitted it to a competition and never got it back. 17 years later, a curious customer who happened to have the same surname picked up the work in a used book store, but it was still another 41 years before the world heard this lost treasure.

American Symphony Orchestra

For more than half a century the American Symphony Orchestra has hewn to founder Leopold Stokowski's original vision: "to offer concerts of great music within the means of everyone." That means its shows aren't just financially affordable, they're also demystified by conductor lectures and never held inside biodomes. In recent years, the organization has added a new facet to its time-tested strategy: curated concerts built around a theme. Shows might explore a particular place and time, examine a literary motif, or delve into the interaction between music and visual art. This strategy has attracted a lot of attention, and not just from audiences: such greats as Yo-Yo Ma, Deborah Voigt, Sarah Chang, and Carnegie Hall's mask-wearing Phantoms of the Barbershop Quartet have all vied to play with the Orchestra.


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