Nightlife in Fort Drum

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When it first opened in 1858, the building that stood on the Brockville Arts Centre's current location operated as a town hall, marketplace, and fire engine house. Only two bricks from that original building remain, as the intervening 150 years saw numerous expansions and reconstructions, as well as a 1937 fire that destroyed the auditorium. In its place today stands an expansive centre for the local arts community, welcoming touring concerts and comedians beneath the glow of its chandeliers.

235 King St W
Brockville,
ON
CA

Kingston Rowing Club was founded as a not-for-profit organization in 1978, and operates on the efforts of its volunteer staff. This impassioned group of rowers trains teams for and participates in many regattas each year, and has produced multiple members of the Canadian national rowing team.

Kingston Rowing Club’s coxswains shout orders and spout encouragement to their water-slicing teams of adult and junior rowers. Participants in both recreational and competitive programs row their shells across Inner Harbour, and the club’s prerequisite for either program is the Learn to Row class, which introduces novices to the sport of crew.

1 Cataraqui Street
Kingston,
ON
CA

Gelston Castle Estate is the Northeast’s premier concert and event destination, presenting world-class music and exhibitions on a beautiful 330 acre estate overlooking the Mohawk Valley in upstate New York. The natural beauty, panoramic view and historic hospitality make for an unequalled concert experience.

980 Robinson Rd
Mohawk,
NY
US

Nestled in Syracuse’s historic Armory Square district, PJ’s Pub and Grill’s unpretentious atmosphere belies the filet mignon sizzling in its kitchen. Patrons can slice into gourmet beef cuts and other upscale dinner entrees, such as a sesame-crusted tuna and portobello-stuffed ravioli, as games unfold on the eatery’s big-screen TVs. Alternatively, diners can opt for bar-style eats, which complement a bar-sized selection of wine, beer and shots. Dishes range from shepherd’s pie and grilled paninis to burgers, such as the Southwestern, crowned in pepper jack cheese and onion straws. A daily rotation of lunch and happy-hour specials adds an element of surprise to the dining experience, much like finding a winning lottery ticket in your date's wallet, and groups can retire to a choice of two brick-walled banquet halls for private celebrations.

116 Walton St
Syracuse,
NY
US

An old-fashioned marquee illuminates the entrance to the Palace Theater, its scarlet and gold light beaming just as brightly as when the venue first opened in 1922. Back then, it was a 1,300-seat neighborhood movie theater with a second-floor dine and dance ballroom. That was owner Alfred Dibella's vision, and when he passed away in 1959, he made sure the theater landed safely in the hands of his daughter, Frances.

Today, the Palace remains a family heirloom. Much like a dubstep remix of the Gettysburg Address, the current space is a mixture of modern technology and vintage appeal, retaining its architectural integrity despite updates over the years. Perhaps the biggest change has been Palace's transformation from a single-screen movie house into a multi-use event space, capable of hosting everything from rehearsal dinners to graduation ceremonies.

2384 James St
Syracuse,
NY
US

Not many establishments offer the chance to see a Steven Sondheim musical, catch a concert, take a theater workshop, and eat an organic salad in one place. But at Red House Arts Center, all of these things flourish. Founded and renovated by a group of local artists, the center beckons visitors to fully immerse themselves in the arts, whether they’re watching an experimental-theater performance, strolling the halls of the second-floor art gallery, or pouring a bucket of house paint on themselves in the lobby.

201 S West St
Syracuse,
NY
US