Nightlife in Fort Drum

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When it first opened in 1858, the building that stood on the Brockville Arts Centre's current location operated as a town hall, marketplace, and fire engine house. Only two bricks from that original building remain, as the intervening 150 years saw numerous expansions and reconstructions, as well as a 1937 fire that destroyed the auditorium. In its place today stands an expansive centre for the local arts community, welcoming touring concerts and comedians beneath the glow of its chandeliers.

235 King St W
Brockville,
ON
CA

Kingston Rowing Club was founded as a not-for-profit organization in 1978, and operates on the efforts of its volunteer staff. This impassioned group of rowers trains teams for and participates in many regattas each year, and has produced multiple members of the Canadian national rowing team.

Kingston Rowing Club’s coxswains shout orders and spout encouragement to their water-slicing teams of adult and junior rowers. Participants in both recreational and competitive programs row their shells across Inner Harbour, and the club’s prerequisite for either program is the Learn to Row class, which introduces novices to the sport of crew.

1 Cataraqui Street
Kingston,
ON
CA

Time to Laugh Comedy Club has earned a black belt in gut busting by providing well-known and amateur stand-ups from across North America a stage from which to cast their punch lines. December’s rotating lineup sports a cabal of Canadian joke hurlers such as impressionist Mark Walker and observational cannon Mike Harrison, as well as the hard-rocking riffs of musical comic Jay Brown. With seating for more than 200 audience members, the club pleasantly accommodates pairs and clusters of friends determined to break the monotony of hosting monotony nights at home. Time to Laugh is situated in the Hub of Kingston, making it a convenient comedic nightcap after dinner or a business-casual food fight at one of the many neighbouring restaurants.

394 Princess Street
Kingston,
ON
CA

Before 1953, the theater community of Rome was a theater community divided. Two local companies presented plays: the Rome Theater Guild and the Rome Civic Theater. The Guild was more financially stable, but the Civic had more volunteers. Seeing how they could benefit each other, the artists at each group decided to join forces and become the Rome Community Theater.

Decades later, the curtain is still being raised on fresh RCT productions. And as the company has grown, the audiences have, too?approximately 1,000 theatergoers flock to see seasonal offerings of musicals, comedies, murder mysteries, and melodramas. The excitement unfolds within the intimacy of a tiered, 230-seat space where everybody has an interrupted view, unless it's Mandatory Lincoln Hat Day.

8911 Turin Road
Rome,
NY
US

Gelston Castle Estate is the Northeast’s premier concert and event destination, presenting world-class music and exhibitions on a beautiful 330 acre estate overlooking the Mohawk Valley in upstate New York. The natural beauty, panoramic view and historic hospitality make for an unequalled concert experience.

980 Robinson Rd
Mohawk,
NY
US

Nestled in Syracuse’s historic Armory Square district, PJ’s Pub and Grill’s unpretentious atmosphere belies the filet mignon sizzling in its kitchen. Patrons can slice into gourmet beef cuts and other upscale dinner entrees, such as a sesame-crusted tuna and portobello-stuffed ravioli, as games unfold on the eatery’s big-screen TVs. Alternatively, diners can opt for bar-style eats, which complement a bar-sized selection of wine, beer and shots. Dishes range from shepherd’s pie and grilled paninis to burgers, such as the Southwestern, crowned in pepper jack cheese and onion straws. A daily rotation of lunch and happy-hour specials adds an element of surprise to the dining experience, much like finding a winning lottery ticket in your date's wallet, and groups can retire to a choice of two brick-walled banquet halls for private celebrations.

116 Walton Street
Syracuse,
NY
US