Things To Do In Halifax

Five or Ten Drop-In Classes or Three Month Membership with Uniform at Atlantic Karate Club (Up to 62% Off)

Atlantic Karate Club

Armdale

Get fit and master a range of Chito Ryu karate arts, including sparring and weapons, at the oldest dojo in Atlantic Canada.

C$50 C$19

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10 or 20 Tae Kwon Do Classes at Hiltz Taekwon-Do (Up to 86% Off)

Hiltz Taekwon-Do

Multiple Locations

Students from kids and adults learn discipline and self-defense fundamentals through tae kwon do, a Korean martial art

C$100 C$19

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$40 for $80 Groupon — The Mystic Harp Yoga Studio

The Mystic Harp Yoga Studio

North End

Local businesses like this one promote thriving, distinctive communities by offering a rich array of goods and services to locals like you

$80 $40

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One, Two, or Three Years of Online Guitar Lessons at Dangerous Guitar (Up to 91% Off) 

Dangerous Guitar

Online Deal

More than 650 high-definition videos give professional instruction in a wide range of playing styles

C$134.55 C$18

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10 or 20 Classes at Sculptura Women's Fitness (Up to 70% Off)

Sculptura Women's Fitness

Sculptura Fitness

Fitness instructors help guests shed pounds in boot-camp sessions and increase flexibility in Pilates classes

C$150 C$59

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Maritime Museum of the Atlantic for Two Adults with Option for Two Kids (Up to 50% Off)

Maritime Museum of the Atlantic

Downtown Halifax

Special exhibit within Canada’s oldest Maritime museum explores the effects and legacy of the War of 1812 on Nova Scotia

C$18.50 C$10

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One-Hour or 90-Minute Sail for Two Adults or a Family of Four Aboard "Tall Ship Silva" or Tall Ship "Mar" (Up to 40% Off)

Tall Ship Silva & Tall Ship Mar

Murphys the Cable Wharf

Historic Swedish and Danish schooners afford views of Halifax Harbour as passengers relax or help crew to hoist sails or steer the vessel

C$68.98 C$42

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Deep-Sea Fishing for One Adult and One Child or Two or Four Adults from Murphy's The Cable Wharf (Up to 47% Off)

Murphy's The Cable Wharf

Downtown Halifax

Reel in cod, haddock, mackerel, and Boston bluefish from a boat equipped with a full bar

C$109.22 C$61

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He wears a beaming smile and a red cap, beneath which his eyes turn to meet those of the happy children who pass his way. He is 65 feet tall. He is a boat.

The fleet at Murphy's The Cable Wharf also includes seven other vessels, but the most recognizable is surely Theodore Too: an enormous, custom-built life-size replica of the friendly Theodore Tugboat, star of the CBC children's television show of the same name. He was originally commissioned to sail up and down the Eastern Seaboard, giving kids a chance to take harbor cruises that were previously only possible in their daydreams, until eventually the staff of Murphy's stepped in to give him a permanent home.

Theodore Too wasn't the first remarkable vessel in the Murphy's fleet. In the early 1980s, Captain Gerald Murphy purchased the Mar, a seasoned tall ship that had sailed around the world twice and been the subject of a documentary. He used this storied vessel to establish Murphy's The Cable Wharf, a sailing and tour company based in Halifax Harbour. With ships in the water, Murphy also planned a restaurant?repurposing the old Cable Ship Terminal, which was built in 1913 and had long been dormant.

Decades later, Murphy's nautical vision lives on. The Mar still glides across harbour waters for themed sailing tours and pirate cruises. The spacious Haligonian III embarks on whale-watching excursions that bring passengers face-to-face with minke whales and dolphins, and the Harbour Queen I?an old-fashioned Mississippi-style sternwheeler?embarks on narrated history tours.

The wharf restaurant, meanwhile, continues the nautical theme on dry land, showing off unobstructed views of the waterfront. It even brings a bit of the sea indoors: a lobster tank filled with more than 300 live crustaceans lets guests net their own meals, while a touch tank brings them face-to-face with native marine life. Coastal dishes, from a buttery lobster roll to pan-fried haddock, fuel more maritime adventures.

1751 Lower Water St.
Halifax,
NS
CA

Though the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic has been open to the public for more than six decades, within its walls, time stands still. Here, steamships still travel up rivers, the Battle of the Atlantic wages on, and Nova Scotia is still rallying to aid in the aftermath of the Titanic disaster. Through permanent and rotating exhibits, the museum?which is the largest of its kind in Canada?lets visitors relive these and other key moments in maritime history.

Located on Halifax's historic waterfront, the museum's collections house more than 24,000 artifacts of Canada's naval and maritime heritage. The permanent exhibition Halifax Wrecked intimately connects visitors with the events and aftermath of that historic disaster, considered to the the largest man-made explosion before the atomic bomb. A thorough Titanic exhibit lets viewers experience what life was like on the doomed ship, including a replica deck chair to sit in and an authentic one to admire. Visitors can also enjoy the museum's largest artifact, CSS Acadia, a 101 year-old ship on the water (check for availability). Beyond receiving free admission for children 5 and younger, kids and parents will find plenty to enjoy, as well, including the massive tentacles of a full-size kraken and Merlin, the friendly rainbow macaw and museum mascot. At the William Robertson & Son store, guests can soak up the waterfront atmosphere or try their hand at making their own knot craft.

1675 Lower Water St
Halifax,
NS
CA

Since its inception in 1992, Curves has been specifically designed with women in mind. Founders Gary and Diane Heavin set out to create a supportive, encouraging atmosphere in which women could get in shape without feeling self-conscious. Their unofficial motto, "no makeup, no men, no mirrors," is now repeated at nearly 10,000 locations in more than 85 countries, helping women of all ages and fitness levels reach their health goals. To cater to the all-female client base, their equipment and specialized workouts are built to enhance the feminine physique.

Their classic 30-minute workout is designed to work the entire body. As ladies move from station to station, they complete a circuit-style workout that intersperses weight training with cardio sessions designed to maintain heart rate. Most of the 13 machines are double positive, which means they work two opposing muscle groups with a single movement—simultaneously toning the abs and back, or the chest and vestigial tail. Each machine also supports the CurvesSmart system, which tracks each patron's individual progress. Before getting started, clients receive a card with their personal fitness information embedded within. When the card is inserted into a machine, a green light lets them know that they’re working at the correct intensity level. As muscles get stronger, the workouts get tougher, and at the end of each session, a progress report lists details on muscle strength and the number of calories burned.

3514 Joseph Howe Dr
Halifax,
NS
CA

Long before its first kayak hit the water, East Coast Outfitters (ECO) established a commitment to helping the local community as well as the environment. The eco-tourism company is based in the small fishing village of Lower Prospect, which suffered a massive collapse in the groundfishing industry. To help the town recover, the company started employing residents as guides, maintenance workers, and even office managers.

Today, ECO put the area's cultural heritage and abundant wildlife on display at the same time through sea kayak tours and watercraft rentals.

Every tour and skill-building or certification class departs ECO's floating wharf under the watchful eye of at least one expert guide. These guides have all completed a rigorous eight-month training program, and are certified by Paddle Canada and in Wilderness First Aid, making them quite capable of assisting paddlers.

Most excursions are suitable for all experience levels and range from the half-day to multi-day tour, plus special trips at sunset. Tour guides lead kayaks past the rocky coasts of wild islands and explore sheltered inlets. Sometimes, local wildlife such as eagles, seals, and whales make appearances.

2017 Lower Prospect Rd.
Lower Prospect,
NS
CA

Surprisingly spry for a 90-year-old, Gus the gopher tortoise greets Museum of Natural History visitors while strolling around the premises and snacking on clover and dandelions. As the museum's mascot for more than six decades, Gus has amassed a substantial following, and he keeps his 1,500+ Facebook friends abreast of the latest goings-on at his home's seven permanent galleries. Unearthed tools, arrowheads, and Tupperware of the Mi'kmaq and Acadian peoples await in the archaeology exhibit, and the pre-contact culture, religion, and language of Nova Scotia come to life in the ethnology hall. Life-sized models of feathered bipeds and four-legged furballs lurk in the mammals-and-birds gallery. Live snakes, frogs, salamanders, and honeybees call Netukulimk home, embodying a Mi'kmaq conception of the relationship between the human and natural worlds.

1747 Summer St Downtown
Halifax,
NS
CA

Glowing monkeys scamper toward a neon waterfall, and a knight bearing a radiant yellow lance rides past a bright orange octopus emerging from the ocean. What appears to be a time-traveling session gone awry is really the evolving environment within Putting Edge’s indoor black-lit mini-golf course, which whisks players to deep seas, Aztec jungles, and medieval times. Since opening its original location in Canada, Putting Edge has now expanded to 18 North American locations, all of which invite guests onto its challenging 18-hole courses to seek victory over opponents and the forces that keep their teeth from not glowing as brightly as they could. Elsewhere, the facility houses private party rooms, concessions, and an arcade filled with gamer favorites such as air hockey.

182 Chain Lake Dr
Halifax,
NS
CA