Deals in Sierra Vista Southeast

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When the Smiths pulled up their roots in British Columbia and moved to Arizona, they brought their love of agriculture with them. But they started small?just growing English cucumbers in a greenhouse. Today, the family-run farm has hugely expanded, and 95% of their "veganic", organically-grown produce is distributed in-state.

Year-round, the greenhouses give shelter to a wide variety of vegetables, including micro-greens, herbs, lettuces, kale, beets, carrots, onions, cucumbers, eggplants, and tomatoes. Depending on the season, FarmBoxes are packed with the customer's choice of assorted locally-grown produce that is freshly harvested from the earth, plucked from a shrub, or stolen from a wood nymph that very week.

54 Brewery Avenue
Bisbee,
AZ
US

Little League Rescue changes the fate of animals on high-kill shelters' euthanasia lists. The volunteer-run rescue lifts the animals out of the shelter system, placing them instead in loving, temporary foster homes. Many of these animals are ill, injured, or suffering from malnourishment, so the organization attains the necessary medical care to return them to health. Every animal is spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and microchipped, and loving foster parents, as well as trainers, help them overcome psychological issues and again be healthy, happy pets ready for their permanent homes.

See how Groupon helps you discover local causes and lend a helping hand at the Groupon Grassroots blog.

Po box 605
Hereford,
AZ
US

Jamie Szybala followed in her family’s footsteps when she became a second-generation healer and practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine. She treats allergies and chronic pain with hair-thin acupuncture needles or cupping treatments, which entail suctioning cups onto the skin to move areas of stagnant blood. She also helps her clients improve their wellness with a custom blend of herbs in granular form, as a pill, or disguised as a Twinkie.

120 Naco Road
Bisbee,
AZ
US

Bisbee began as a mining camp tucked away in the Mule Mountains. With the discovery of copper and precious metals toward the end of the 19th century, the town eventually grew into a full-fledged boomtown somewhat notorious for the numerous saloons and brothels lining a district known as Brewery Gulch. But Bisbee was also the cultural center of the southwest—home to an opera house and the state's first community library. To survive after the large-scale mines closed in the 1970s, Bisbee evolved into an artists' colony, attracting free spirits drawn to its unique history, warm temperatures, and lax enforcement of coloring-within-the-lines statutes. In recent years, the town has settled into its niche as a hybrid blend of old and new, where 19th-century storefronts house contemporary art galleries, eclectic boutiques, and cafés.Take a stroll along the narrow, winding streets of Old Bisbee, which resembles a frontier outpost crossed with a European village. Stop in and explore the exhibits at the Bisbee Mining and Historical Museum, once the headquarters of the Copper Queen mining company and now an affiliate museum of the Smithsonian Institution. Of course, no trip to Bisbee would be complete without a visit to the mine that started it all. Head over to Queen Mine Tours, don a hard hat, and ride a mine train deep underground on a guided tour. Read the Fine Print for important info on travel dates and other restrictions.

818 Tombstone Canyon
Bisbee,
AZ
US

Located in the southeast corner of Arizona about 80 miles from Tucson, Bisbee is a small country village with a distinctively quirky vibe. Nestled about a mile up in the Mule Mountains, the town is filled with steep hills and narrow, winding roads, which can make for an aerobic afternoon of exploring. In the early 1900s, Bisbee attracted thousands of laborers to its high-yielding copper, silver, and gold mines, which helped to make it one of the largest cities in the southwest. The operations closed in the early 1970s, however, and the boom died down. You can still get a taste of the old days at mining museums and stagecoach drag races, but the town is now primarily a funky artists’ colony abounding with galleries and antique shops. Read the Fine Print for important info on travel dates and other restrictions.

901 Tombstone Cyn
Bisbee,
AZ
US

In the early 1900s, nearly 50 saloons and bordellos lined the streets of Bisbee, which attracted thousands of laborers for its high-yielding copper, silver, and gold mines. Known as "the Queen of the Copper Camps," the mining mecca was considered the largest and richest city between St. Louis and San Francisco until the operations closed in the 1970s and the town converted into a thriving artists colony. Modern Bisbee has preserved its historic downtown, attracting filmmakers who converge on the authentic southwest community to shoot Old Western films and spar with swinging saloon doors.

45 OK Street
Bisbee,
AZ
US