Museums in Central Houston, Houston


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  • Art Car Museum
    A trip to the Art Car Museum located in Houston off the Katy Freeway (I-10) is something that won’t be soon forgotten. Houston has the largest number of art cars of any city. The art car movement emphasizes personal expression. The museum, also known as “Garage Mahal” features awe-inspiring works of art in which cars are the canvas. Art car artists take standard vehicles and transform them into formidable pieces of art. According to the museum’s website, "The Museum has its conceptual origins in the 1984 Collision show curated by Ann Harithas at the Lawndale Art Center." There are special exhibitions scheduled throughout the year. The museum is open Wednesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. (closed Monday and Tuesday). Admission is free and parking is free.
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    140 Heights Blvd
    Houston, TX US
  • Buffalo Bayou Artpark
    Buffalo Bayou Artpark in Houston features a wide array of creative art pieces that tell a story. Parking is plentiful, so visitors can feel free to bring their vehicles.
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    3201 Allen Pkwy
    Houston, TX US
  • Museum of Printing History
    It might seem strange to see a Gutenberg Bible page pulled using mid-1400s technology, or the Declaration of Independence being printed on an authentic 19th-century iron hand-press. At The Printing Museum, where local artists give live demonstrations of real, working artifacts, these sights are almost commonplace. In its mission to preserve and share the history of written communication, the organization functions as part museum and part interactive classroom. A permanent collection highlights preserved prints and gear from around the world—from ancient Mesopotamian clay tablets to Civil War-era newspapers. This collection even includes a display of equipment and documents belonging to Texas' first printer. However, the museum's four galleries and 14,000 square feet of space aren't just reserved for relics. Every year, staff curate 12 rotating exhibits that, in the past, have covered the work of contemporary printmakers and photographers or explored the evolution of modern printing around the world. Meanwhile, an on-site print shop holds hands-on, all-ages workshops in typography, paper-making, and other forms of print-based art.
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    1324 W Clay St
    Houston, TX US
  • Beer Can House
    After retiring from his upholstering job at the Southern Pacific Railroad, John Milkovisch spent his free time building structures around his house and drinking beers with his wife Mary. But when he ran out of space for building, he decided to use up his extra beer cans to create a shiny siding for his structures and his house. He began in 1968, and within 20 years he had completely covered his property with an estimated 50,000 aluminum and glass cans. The result was both fashionable and functional, with swaying garlands tinkling in the breeze, strings of cans adding a luster to all surfaces of the house, and the protective weight of the cans even helping cut the house’s energy costs. But you can’t have a house this striking and not get noticed. So pretty soon people began making trips to see this can-covered house, and in 2007, it was moved into the Orange Show Center for Visionary Art. Now guests can peer inside the house and examine the structures without getting chased by the owner's beer can-covered dog. The house’s guided tours also feature a documentary that covers the history of the project since its inception forty years ago.
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    222 Malone St
    Houston, TX US
  • Museum of Fine Arts Houston
    The story begins, in a way, with Ima Hogg. It was her land on which Carroll Sterling Masterson and her husband Harris Masterson III planned to build their home after they purchased it in 1952. The Mastersons, working with renowned architect John Staub, erected a sprawling home they named Rienzi, whose layout blended contemporary elements with homages to Palladian and 18th-century English design. Having dedicated their lives to the arts, the philanthropists gave their home to the Museum of Fine Arts Houston in 1991, and the building was opened to the public in 1999. Rienzi Museum of Fine Arts Houston now houses the Masterson’s eclectic collection of European decorative arts that they assembled over the course of 40 years, ranging from paintings, furnishings, and miniatures made from the 17th through the mid-19th centuries. Giving visitors of all ages a chance to understand the collection’s nuances, Rienzi staff hosts educational programs and events throughout the year, engaging guests in activities such as sketching sessions, art workshops, and lectures. Along with their dedication to visual arts, the museum celebrates the music of the 17th–19th centuries via live performances of chamber music, opera, and selections from Beethoven’s spoken-word album. Rienzi also features gardens designed in the 1950s by landscape architect Ralph Ellis Gunn. Having created a visually stunning green space that embraced the 4.4-acre property’s natural topography, Gunn’s garden remains a tranquil haven of lush plants and scenic trails.
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    1406 Kirby Drive
    Houston, TX US
  • Bayou Bend Collection and Gardens
    Whether you're looking for artistic inspiration or to brush up on your art knowledge, Bayou Bend Collection and Gardens in Houston is the museum for you. Parking is plentiful, so guests can feel free to bring their vehicles.
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    1 Westcott Street
    Houston, TX US

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