BBQ Restaurants in Boardman

Select Local Merchants

Cuisine Type: Barbecue and American comfort food

Established: 2013

Reservations: Not necessary

Handicap Accessible: Yes

Number of Tables: 11?25

Parking: Parking lot

Most popular offering: Smoked meats

Kid-friendly: Yes

Alcohol: Full bar

Delivery/Take-out Available: Yes

Outdoor Seating: No

The aroma of Southern-style barbecue fills Tavern of Solon, rising above the top of its restored 1950s high-school scoreboard and up to the ceiling. Under the watchful eye of owner Rich Earle, the casual pub crafts dishes such as Angus burgers topped with Carolina-style barbecue pork and smoked or fried wings entirely in-house. The pillars of the menu, though, are the slow-smoked barbecue platters?pork, brisket, chicken, and baby back ribs?paired with traditional sides, including coleslaw and cornbread muffins. Events, such as live music on Saturday nights and screenings of Sunday- and Monday-night NFL games, contribute to the lively atmosphere. Decades-old photos of the city of Solon line the walls, conjuring a blend of local pride and nostalgia.

33587 Aurora Rd
Solon,
OH
US

The Flame BBQ’s two soul-food kitchens sling slow-cooked pulled pork, collard greens, and brisket onto plates and catering trays. Rolls sop up the barbecue sauce that smothers spare ribs, pulled chicken, and beef. Stack a Mac meals, a Flame specialty, fold barbecued meat into creamy mac ‘n’ cheese that is accompanied by a cup of sauce and several high-fives. Other unique offerings include brisket burritos bundled in a tortilla and catered whole-roasted pigs, piglets, or lambs.

1805 Babcock Blvd
Pittsburgh,
PA
US

When the family behind Super-Stuff Super-Licious restaurant fired up their three sidewalk grills in 1985, they began a local BBQ legacy that was strong enough to attract people from forty miles out. Unfortunately, the booming success couldn’t stop an encroaching schism that would soon split up the relatives and choke the growing business. It took nearly 20 years of slow-cooked reconciliation and, according to the restaurant’s website, a spiritual awakening to bring the family and the business back together in 2005. Today, Robbie's Super-Stuff Super-Licious BBQ Restaurant continues the tradition they started more than 35 years ago.

The barbecue mavens stock their kitchen with fresh, local ingredients and meats. They season each of their ribs, chickens, and steaks—sousing some slabs with more than a dozen herbs and spices—before sizzling them atop an open-pit grill. They then slather these flavorful cuts in one of three sauces: hot-, mild-, or mustard-barbecue sauce. They also prepare homestyle sides, such as collard greens and signature cornbread, to accessorize meat-centric entrees or cocktail dresses.

1000 Ardmore Blvd
Pittsburgh,
PA
US

The pitmasters at the Harvard & Highland location of Union Pig & Chicken keep the menu simple, and in fact, very true to their name. Every day, they smoke up St. Louis ribs, barbecued chicken, brisket, and pork shoulder, as well as tofu, sausages, and seafood. The menu of traditional and non-so-traditional barbecue is rounded out with buttermilk fried chicken and sides such as cornbread, mac and cheese, and creamy coleslaw to create meals that emulate Southern picnics without buying a blanket in Scarlett O'Hara's green-and-white dress fabric. Meals can be washed down with a range of sodas, house-made sweet tea, fresh jalape?o-cilantro lemonade, draft beers, or a glass of bourbon.

220 N Highland Ave
Pittsburgh,
PA
US

The Dickey’s Barbecue Pit sign may be ubiquitous today as a spot for good ole’ Texas barbecue, but when Travis Dickey first opened his Dallas shop in 1941, the sign had to share space with advertisements to help pay rent. In the 70 years since then, the Dickeys have done well for themselves, with their initial store spawning a slew of franchises throughout the country. Though the barbecue at each outpost is no longer under the hand of one of Dickey’s descendants, each shop still smokes their own meats in-house to create the signature Texan flavor that infuses their briskets, pulled pork, and fall-off-the-bone ribs. Meals can come in any size, from the a la carte sandwiches to platters that incorporate a chosen number of meats with a buttery roll, a pickle, two homestyle sides, and free ice cream. Whether serving up their dishes in the dining room or packing them up for take-away or catering, the staff ensures that each client gets a taste of Texas home cooking without the hassle rubbing every dish on a campfire crock-pot.

960 N Court St
Medina,
OH
US

Stationed across from Kent Free Library, Wild Goats Café tramples hunger with its selection of homemade comfort food for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Inside the dining room, wood trim runs along the top of sand- and pistachio-shaded walls, creating a warm atmosphere often filled with the smell of fresh-roasted coffee. Friendly servers pirouette between booths and tables delivering omelets in the morning and sandwiches in the afternoon, such as The Goat—an open-faced fusion of melted cheddar, tangy hummus, and veggies stacked atop pita bread. For dinner, the cooks craft a handful of entrees featuring a variety of enticing ingredients, such as organic chicken breast, house roasted sirloin, and homemade tomato cream sauce. Throughout the week, specials reward diners for their visit, including Buck Buck Brinner Wednesday, when eight menu items cost just a dollar apiece, making it the ideal night to finally take your pet elephant out for dinner.

319 W Main St
Kent,
OH
US