Diners in Charlton

Select Local Merchants

The vintage diner car's heaping portions of traditional American comfort food earned praise from a recent episode of TLC's American Eats. Owner Kim Kniskern fills the narrow eatery with the sweet aroma of her specialty french toast ($4.95), along with a menu full of morning-time eats that celebrate the moon's inability to steal the earth's bacon. Egg and toast platters draw inspiration from different cultures, such as the American breakfast, which pairs grilled sirloin tips with the ovoid classics ($7.95), and the Polynesian breakfast, which arrives bearing a sizzling helping of fried spam ($5.95). Savory lunch options are also available to sate noon-time cravings.

300 Southbridge St
Worcester,
MA
US

Lauded for its signature Italian-style pizzas topped with everything from spaghetti and meatballs to mac 'n' cheese, Muncheez pads its menu with burgers, pastas, sandwiches, wraps, and specialty desserts. Diners can nosh on 1 of the 11 signature pizzas, which are flown to the table by a masked, mouthless superhero. Try the Buffalo Soldier, an alfredo-sauced pie topped with buffalo chicken and mozzarella ($7.99/small, $12.99/large), or the Aloha, a Hawaiian-style concoction of ham, bacon, pineapple, and pulled pork ($7.99/small, $12.99/large). Classic and veggie pizza pies also abound.

119 June St
Worcester,
MA
US

Patriots Diner is a throwback to the 1950s, a time when restaurants and soda fountains served as important hubs of socialization. The menu there deepens nostalgia with dishes that the owners hope emulates the cooking most people grew up with. Under glowing lights like hanging martini glasses, plates brim with juicy burgers, fish and chips, meat loaf, and pork chops. Coffee cups warm hands next to all-day breakfast offerings of omelets and waffles beneath walls decorated with vintage magazine covers and photos of Christopher Columbus’ wooden scuba flippers. The restaurant’s neon-blue lights are easily seen from the roadside and match the dining room’s royal blue booths and chrome-trimmed stools.

65 Founders Dr
Woonsocket,
RI
US

At Krazy Jake's, chefs hand-batter fresh seafood and top juicy burgers with sauces made from house recipes. Anchoring the diverse menu, platters of fried haddock and chips or baked sea scallops in lemon-butter sauce sail toward the red horizon of steamed Maine lobster. Specialty burgers such as The 325-pound Shaq Burger #36 is topped with pounds of corned beef and sauerkraut, or a rotating burger of the month pile fresh ingredients onto 8 ounces of Black Angus beef or bison meat. Krazy Jake's also offers a full bar and seating for up to 140 patrons. From some of these counter seats, customers can catch the chefs whip up their sizzling entrees right before their eyes.

For special occasions, diners can enjoy Krazy Jakes's in house in the private dining room or have the mouthwatering entrees catered to special events.

In the warmer months, melting scoops of old-fashioned ice cream flavors, such as moose tracks and rum raisin, drip a path from Krazy Jake's outdoor takeout window to the picnic tables. Year-round, patrons cozy up indoors to vanquish the Super Hero's sundae, powered by vanilla ice cream, banana chunks, and caramelized Kryptonite.

2537 Boston Rd
Wilbraham,
MA
US

Sandee’s Restaurant’s chefs sizzle an Empire State Building–sized menu of American breakfast, lunch, and dinner dishes that have helped the eatery earn awards from The Item. Diners can commence a morning meal with a sweet treat such as cranberry walnut pancakes or a belgian waffle drizzled with what snowmen wear on their birthdays: fruit and homemade whipped cream. Or, browse the menu’s selection of 10 specialty omelets stuffed with varying combinations of 17 ingredients, including feta, peppers, and applewood-smoked bacon. Traditional eggs benedict crowns croissant with ham, poached eggs, and creamy hollandaise sauce, while its Bostonian counterpart’s croissant dons scrambled eggs and corned beef hash, a mix of ingredients inventive enough to induce reconsideration of traditional notions that prevent serving breakfast for dinner or at 3 a.m. at thumping nightclubs.

162 Main St
Lancaster,
MA
US

Lucky Strike Restaurant’s hearty menu of nostalgic comfort fare carries on a tradition that dates back to 1955, when its building was converted from a bowling alley. The signature broasted chicken ($9.50 for three-piece dinner) slices succulent cuts of poultry turned golden by a signature cooking method pioneered by founder Charlie Dugre in the 1960s after froasting and troasting failed to catch on. Bone-in, center-cut pork chops ($12.50) add a choice of two sides to their already-significant bulk, much like a Santa tucking an extra pillow under his suit. At lunch, a platter of fish 'n' chips nets the catch-of-the-day before broasting it and mating it with fries and slaw ($8.95), and breakfast, starting at 6 a.m., lifts lids and perks up taste buds with a flock of omelets ($3.95–$6.50) and meat-centric Hungry Man platters ($7.25–$7.95).

703 Grattan St
Chicopee,
MA
US