Japanese Restaurants in Temple

Select Local Merchants

Diners watch, transfixed, as a chef deftly chops, flips, and sears their meal in front of them while flames leap from the grill. This is Shogun Grill, where customers are often just a seat away from the culinary action.

The griddle-cooked teppenyaki dishes aren’t just for show, either. Packed with fresh chicken, steak, and vegetables, the entrees sate taste buds whose idea of a Japanese meal is more than just tipping a few soy-sauce packets into your mouth. The chefs also whip up fresh sushi starring salmon, eel, soft-shell crab, and smelt eggs.

18816 Limestone Commercial Dr, Ste 100
Pflugerville,
TX
US

Hill Country News named Hayashi Sushi Bar and Grill Best International Fare in 2010. Yelpers give the establishment an average of 3.5 stars, 79% of Urbanspooners recommend it, and 11 OpenTable reviewers give it an overall average rating of 3.5 stars:

1335 E Whitestone Blvd
Cedar Park,
TX
US

Though its name suggests otherwise, the Forget About It roll’s unorthodox ingredients make it pretty memorable: the flavorful crunch of shrimp tempura is wrapped up with crawfish and accented by ginger cream. It's just one of the many unique combinations dreamed up by Piranha Killer Sushi's owner and chef, Kenzo Tran. Non-traditional sushi fixings are Kenzo’s specialty, from the White Lotus roll’s pico de gallo and truffle oil sauce to the Bullet roll’s cilantro chili purée and edible police officer’s badge.

That blend of the classic and unconventional runs throughout Piranha Killer Sushi's menu at all four locations including the newly remodeled location in Fort Worth. Besides distinctive rolls, the kitchen serves up dishes such as Korean beef in ginger marinade, salads with octopus and spicy conch, and blue crab fried rice. Ditto the drink menu, featuring specialty libations such as the saketini, a blend of vodka, gin, and sake with a cucumber garnish. The restaurant's whimsical take on Japanese fare hasn't gone unnoticed—media outlets laud it for its tasty creations and inviting decor.

260 E. Basse
San Antonio,
TX
US

In 2008, brothers Yuen and Peter Yung opened the first How Do You Roll? restaurant, devoting it to inventive, customizable sushi. Since then, the eatery has expanded to multiple locations across four states—and in February of 2013, after they pitched their concept to the notorious panel on ABC's "Shark Tank," an investor decided to sink his teeth into helping the business grow even further. The shark-worthy idea? Chefs invite customers to build their own sushi rolls or bowls, beginning with white or brown rice, which can then be topped or rolled with ingredients such as raw spicy salmon, grilled chicken, avocado, and strawberries. Sauces such as wasabi mayo and toppings such as chili powder finish off each roll.

Other favorites at How Do You Roll? come in the form of preset combinations such as the Mango Tango, whose krab stick, salmon, vegetables, and mango salsa are assembled by a chef holding a rose in his teeth. The menu also caters to healthy-minded diners with low-carb bowls, gluten-free options, and 13 rolls that contain fewer than 300 calories apiece.

454 W 2nd St
Austin,
TX
US

Taking traditional culinary techniques and squeezing them through a filter of modern influences, Nagoya Steak and Sushi refines its menu of familiar Japanese cuisine. Manning tabletop hibachi grills, chefs entertain their hungry audiences by juggling utensils and causing the grills' surfaces to spout flames while they sear orders of chicken, steak, and lobster. Back in the kitchen, another team of chefs sets about topping crispy fillets of red snapper with lime-chili sauce and glazing tuna steaks with teriyaki-balsamic blends.

Striving to create more delicate–yet equally enticing–dishes, sushi chefs fill plates with meticulously sliced sashimi and carefully folded rolls. While the maki selection features a number of traditional sushi-house staples, it also includes the restaurant's own custom-designed creations. Featuring such premium ingredients as lobster tempura, filet mignon, and individually steamed rice grains, these signature rolls offer a fancy dining experience akin to picnicking atop a blimp.

11630 Ranch Road 620 N
Austin,
TX
US

A red horseshoe-shaped bar dominates the dining room at Roll On Sushi Diner, encouraging patrons to grab a stool and watch the chefs as they sculpt maki with inventive ingredients that are reminiscent of an American diner. The menu's Austin-inspired rolls deviate from Japanese traditions, featuring unconventional fillings such as beef brisket, chicken-fried steak, or candied walnuts inside a cylinder of rice and nori instead. As co-owner Chip Reed told Austin Monthly in 2011, "no one has ever told us, ‘you’re not supposed to do that’… so we have no limitations on what we can create." He and his cohort, Chad Reed, helm a staff of servers who place each roll on a color-coded plate that corresponds to its price. This allows diners and servers alike to quickly tally the final bill without hiring a CPA for the afternoon.

5350 Burnet Rd, Ste2
Austin,
TX
US