Things To Do In Coral Gables


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  • University of Miami Track and Field/ Cross Country
    Cheer on the Hurricanes as they defend their home court from the hardwood harassment of evenly matched ACC conference mainstay North Carolina. Guards Malcolm Grant and Durand Scott lead the offensive attack while sophomore center Reggie Johnson controls the lane against UNC's sticky-heeled dribbles and drives. Tickets will be redeemed at the BankUnited Center in a specific area for Groupon subscribers before tipoff.
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    5821 San Amaro Drive
    Coral Gables, FL US
  • Titanic Brewery and Restaurant
    Grab some friends and head on over to Titanic Brewery and Restaurant for great pub grub. Score low-fat and gluten-free eats at Titanic Brewery and Restaurant. Pair your entree with a glass of wine or draft beer — Titanic Brewery and Restaurant has a fully-stocked bar to complement your meal. Bring your whole brood to Titanic Brewery and Restaurant, where families can dig in to tasty and kid-friendly fare together. Titanic Brewery and Restaurant is a prime location to dine with a group. Wireless Internet access is available for no charge at Titanic Brewery and Restaurant. Make a reservation to ensure your table is ready when you are. Shake off the stiff workday duds at Titanic Brewery and Restaurant — attire is casual. Through their catering service, Titanic Brewery and Restaurant can also set out a delicious spread for your next party. For those in a rush, the restaurant lets you take your food to go. Titanic Brewery and Restaurant's guests can take advantage of the easy street and lot parking options. Fancy snacks do come at a higher price, but wow are they delicious. At Titanic Brewery and Restaurant, you have the option of paying by major credit card. Reviewers rave about the dinner menu at the restaurant, though breakfast and lunch are also served.
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    5813 Ponce De Leon Blvd
    Coral Gables, FL US
  • Coconut Grove Seafood Festival
    Tucked between Biscayne Bay and Highway U.S. 1 sits Coconut Grove, which locals refer to as a village within a city. Though enveloped by Miami's sprawl, the neighborhood retains the air of a quaint seaside town, with waterfront parks, fun local eateries, and a yearly seafood festival that combines those two amenities. The Coconut Grove Seafood Festival takes place in Peacock Park on October 20th, a mere five days after official Florida Stone Crab season opens. Vendors serve up the signature, buttery crab in local dishes, but they also bring together some of the most famous seafood flavors from around the world, using fresh caught fish. They grill fillets in Jamaican jerk seasoning, stir fry shellfish in paellas, and slice raw tuna to stuff sushi. They also boil clams and oysters in traditional New England chowders, or spice crawfish to match the hearty flavors of Cajun Jambalaya. While the chefs ply their trade and provide cooking demonstrations for interested visitors and ambitious seagulls, musicians perform on stages and kids frolic in the family fun zone. In between food vendors' stalls, artisans peddle nautically themed arts and crafts. The festival also houses a fish market called Grove Wharf, where expert fishmongers help visitors pick out the perfect fillets for dinner.
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    2550 South Bayshore Drive, Suite 206B
    Coconut Grove, FL US
  • Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden
    Since 1938, the keepers of the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden have cultivated more than 85 acres of floral displays with a mixture of science and art. The gardens are lush with plants valuable to scientists and educators, and the tropical landscapes designed by William Lyman Phillips are like ever-evolving canvases, blooming and fading as the seasons change. Most of the palms, cycads, flowering trees, and vines were collected from the wild, but the grounds also harbor endangered plant species. Guides give English and Spanish tram tours as well as walking tours through specific parts of the gardens, or visitors can explore the displays at their leisure, wandering through the 16,428-square foot two-level Tropical Plant Conservatory exhibit, which blooms with orchids, fruit trees, and rare palms. Cascading waterfalls punctuate the stream flowing through the 2-acre Richard H. Simons Rainforest, where visitors admire the diverse plant life and reflect on the worldwide threat of rapidly vanishing rainforests. The Wings of the Tropics exhibit features thousands of exotic butterflies with tropical fish and rare plant life. Butterflies are released twice daily and the Butterfly Metamorphosis Lab lets kids experience them up close. The water gardens combine tranquility pools with waterfalls, sculpture, and lily pads to evoke a sense of calm.
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    10901 Old Cutler Rd.
    Coral Gables, FL US
  • The Kampong
    After changing hands many times between 1882 and 1916, the property that would eventually be known as The Kampong?which means "village" in Malay?was snatched up by David Fairchild and his wife Marian, a daughter of Alexander Graham Bell. Fairchild was one of the most influential horticulturists in the United States, devoting his life to plant exploration and finding new strains of flora suitable for introduction to the states. Though he and his wife spent much of their time in Washington DC until 1928, The Kampong became an "introduction garden" for many of the plants he collected during his travels. After constructing a house on the garden property in 1928, the Fairchilds made Miami their permanent home, and they were eventually joined by Marian's sister and her husband on the adjoining property. Today, as part of the National Tropical Botanical Garden and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, most of the adjoining property has been absorbed to be part of The Kampong, creating more than 11 acres of verdant gardens. Inside the leafy labyrinth, many of the experimental plants still thrive, including an 80-year-old baobab tree, more than 50 mango varieties.
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    4013 Southwest 37th Ave
    Miami, FL US
  • Lowe Art Museum
    When the University of Miami's Lowe Art Museum began in 1952, the school could comfortably display its entire collection in three unused classrooms. Those days are long past. Today, the museum stands as Miami's most comprehensive collection of western and non-western art. The permanent collections feature pieces drawn from across human history, with notable works including Claude Monet's Waterloo Bridge and a recently acquired face mask from the Dan people of C?te d'Ivoire and Liberia, forged from wood, cloth, and fur. A sizable trove of Native American artifacts includes pieces from the Southeast such as a beautifully embroidered bead shoulder bag. Other exhibits include paintings, sculpture, drawings, prints, and photographs from the Middle Ages through the present, including the Samuel H. Kress Collection of Renaissance and Baroque art, as well as pottery, sculpture, and metalwork from ancient Greece and the Roman Empire, dating from the first millennium BCE through the 4th century CE.
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    285 Aragon Avenue
    Coral Gables, FL US

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