Museums in The Dalles


Select Local Merchants

  • Maryhill Museum of Art
    Samuel Hill was undoubtedly a visionary in his own right, but having friends in high places didn't hurt him any. In 1907 he purchased 5,300 acres along the Columbia River to establish a Quaker farming community and found the Maryhill Land Company, named after his daughter. Seven years later he set to work building a mansion on the hill overlooking the river. But then his company folded and the mansion was without purpose. Enter friend number one: Parisian dance pioneer Loïe Fuller. She advised him to transform the cavernous building into an art museum. Throughout the next several years, he filled its halls with pieces from around the world, supplemented by works from Loïe's artist friends—including Auguste Rodin. And to further demonstrate his web of camaraderie, another friend of Hill's, Queen Marie of Romania, contributed Orthodox art and icons from her homeland. In 1926, the Queen dedicated the mansion as the Maryhill Museum of Art to a crowd of more than 2,000 onlookers. And yet the museum wasn't finished. When Hill died in 1931, the museum's board of trustees stepped in to helm the completion of the project. On May 13, 1940, on what would've been Hill's 83rd birthday, they opened the museum to the public. In the years immediately following, Hill collaborator and arts patron Alma de Bretteville Spreckels fortified the museum's already-impressive collection with works of art loaned and gifted from her own home. Today Maryhill overlooks the same vista, plus a sculpture garden, displaying its diverse collection of art from around the world. In addition to 80 original pieces by Rodin, including The Thinker, paintings by other European and American artists, and the Théâtre de la Mode French fashion exhibition, the museum's halls display Native American works from prehistoric times to the modern age. It also caters to younger minds with an activity room filled with games and child-friendly activity guides that make art accessible to kids so that parents don't have to carve Starry Night into their grilled cheese sandwiches.
    Read More
    35 Maryhill Museum Drive
    Goldendale, WA US
  • Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum
    Museums have a reputation for housing dusty, fragile artifacts that normally shouldn't be touched. But the Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum is a different breed. Its passionate staff and crew of volunteers have collected and restored hundreds of historical cars, planes, and other vehicles, all of which they regularly start up and drive. Size: not surprisingly, the museum is located in an indoor hangar that stretches for more than 2.5 acres and can take more than a day to fully explore Eye Catcher: larger antique tractors, trucks, and military Jeeps loom over a fleet of their smaller siblings Permanent Mainstay: the Curtiss JN-4D "Jenny" from 1917 was lovingly restored by the museum's experts, who even applied the plane's finish the traditional way: with horsehair brushes. These planes were standard training aircraft for pilots in WWI. Don't Miss: seven different Ford Model T's from model years 1914–1927 Hidden Gems: the museum has almost 30 vintage motorcycles hiding beneath airplane wings and between cars. Guests are encouraged to try and spot all the hogs, including several Harley-Davidsons and one extra-elusive one named Waldo Special Programs: every "Second Saturday" of the month is a volunteer action day, when expert volunteers fire up the display vehicles for driving and flying demos
    Read More
    1600 Air Museum Rd
    Hood River, OR US
  • The History Museum
    In 1907, the Hood River County Pioneer Society started collecting documents and artifacts that reflected the diversity and culture of their region. Now those items are housed at The History Museum in a collection that totals 11,000-plus pieces and continues to grow weekly. With a focus on memorabilia that dates from the Native American era to the present, the museum’s exhibits include horse-drawn carriages, phonographs, and the barometer a witch concocted to predict the weather. To further immerse visitors in the county’s history, the costumed guides of the museum’s annual Cemetery Tales relay historical anecdotes during stops at notable gravesides. The tours are one of many events and educational programs available through the museum, many of which are geared toward kids. Other include yoga sessions that relate different poses to points in history and camps where youngsters learn to throw an atlatl, a spear used by Native Americans.
    Read More
    300 East Port Marina Drive
    Hood River, OR US
  • Philip Foster Farm
    Philip Foster was one of the few Americans who could say they helped establish one of the United States. As one of Oregon's earliest pioneers, Foster was instrumental in settling travelers during the mid- to late-19th Century. He helped build and operate Barlow Road, and even directed travelers into Willamette Valley by guiding covered wagons and waving a candle for landing airplanes on foggy nights. Foster's farm and home in Eagle Creek also played a major role in the area's history. Today, visitors can explore the property's house, store, barn, and outbuildings, all while soaking up historical facts from guides in period clothing. Guests can also stop by the farm for annual events, including a Dutch oven cook-off, garden parties, and other seasonal festivities.
    Read More
    29912 SE Highway 211
    Eagle Creek, OR US
  • Oregon Museum of Science and Industry
    The entire Earth spins inside of the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. It's as if visitors have launched into outer space, where they can see everything—clouds forming over North America, hurricanes churning in the tropics, and millions of animals in migration. Night falls, and the major cities light up Earth's continents like misshapen Christmas trees. Just then, the planet disappears, and in its place rises a spinning orb of fire and violent solar storms: the sun. The display, appropriately titled Science On a Sphere, is actually a 6-foot animated globe powered by a series of video projectors. It serves as the perfect centerpiece for OMSI's Earth Hall, which explores geology, tectonics, and everything else that makes Earth a living planet. The hall's exhibits let visitors control wind turbines and launch satellites into space. Earth Hall is only one section of the museum, however. More hands-on activities wait within Turbine Hall, where kids design bridges and boats. Visitors can tour the USS Blueback, a U.S. Navy attack submarine that guarded the Pacific for 31 years, or gaze towards the heavens inside of Kendall Planetarium, which uses real-time 3D graphics to transport audiences into the very heart of black holes. Even Theory, the onsite eatery, has an educational focus. The restaurant's displays explore food sciences while Chef Ryan Morgan and his team use local ingredients to cook meals in full view. Although every corner of OMSI sparks scientific curiosity, the museum's educational programs take things one step further. The faculty hosts astronomy camps and teaches 50-minute interactive labs in which kids might make soap or dissect a squid—a requisite skill for any future biologist or sushi chef.
    Read More
    1945 SE Water Ave.
    Portland, OR US
  • Pittock Mansion
    A beautiful combination of classic Turkish, English, and French architectural design, the Pittock Mansion was built in 1914 by Oregonian craftsmen and artisans, and from Northwestern materials. To avoid looming demolition and development plans, the city bought up and restored the property, which now offers a unique look into the lavish lives of one of Portland’s foremost founders.
    Read More
    3229 NW Pittock Dr
    Portland, OR US

Groupon Guide

Advertisement