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Restaurants in Dallas

When they say that everything is bigger in Texas, believe it. And the saying definitely includes the Dallas food scene. So much so that, because of all the options, finding the answer to the age old question “What do you want to eat” can be a bit tricky. As you might expect, the restaurants in Dallas, Texas serve some of the best tex mex and BBQ food in the country, but don’t go thinking that’s all this town has to offer. Check out some of the best restaurants in Dallas.

Best Restaurants in Dallas

 

Bolsa

New American food restaurants may be all over the country, but Bolsa is just different. This dynamic spot is one you’ll want to visit more than once, with an ever-changing menu that covers breakfast, brunch, lunch, and dinner. The Texas cheese board is so pretty you almost don’t want to eat (almost). Plus, their award-winning patio will take any meal to the next level.

 

Simply Fondue Dallas

When you think Dallas, fondue probably isn’t the first thing that comes to your mind, but this restaurant is a modern delicacy and a local favorite. Why? Fondue! Need we say more?

 

Cafe Izmir

This homestyle Mediterranean eatery flaunts influences from Turkish, Lebanese, and Persian cuisines. With tapas-style plates, you can get a taste of almost everything, like the citrus-spiked tabbouleh and warmed eegra or the tomato-speckled dip of grilled baby eggplant. And what would a Mediterranean meal be without a bit of hummus? Owner Mama Nazy’s beloved hummus, accented with a pinch of house spice blend, won the accolades of the Dallas Observer, which named it the city’s Best Hummus in 2010. Here, you’re in good hands.

Best Mexican Restaurants in Dallas

There’s no shortage of excellent authentic Mexican restaurants in Dallas, but you definitely need to weed out the subpar spots. Here are some of our favorites:

 

  • Twister Street Tacos: known for its authentic version of the street-taco staple al pastor and fresh, homemade salsas
  • Los Jalapenos: traditional Mexican fare culled from generations-old recipes, including classics such as fajitas and tacos
  • Hut Hut Little Elm: fusion Mexonesian cuisine, aka where Tex-Mex classics get a Polynesian twist like slow-roasted pork and pineapple tacos, and pu-pu platters loaded with coconut shrimp, salmon, and fresh fish tacos   
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What is Tex Mex?

Shannon Grilli

The stuff you usually call Mexican Food is actually pretty American in origin. But just what is Tex Mex and how is it defined?

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Best Restaurants in Dallas for American Food

 

The Pantry Restaurant

A spot that has been serving up homestyle cooking since 1982, including classic American eats like chicken-fried steak, patty-melt burgers, and pecan and apple pies.

 

Cafe de France

A restaurant with a relaxed, family vibe that will anyone and everyone feel at home. Cafe de France's owners, the Gilani family, have been serving their signature French pastries and entrees at their cozy, family-oriented restaurant for more than 30 years, including flaky breakfast pastries and croissants and sweet and savory crepes.

 

Ron’s Place

32 craft beers on tap! This beer-focused restaurant has a spirits selection that rivals its brew list, as well as a full food menu brimming with pasta and sandwiches.

Chop Suey Vs. Chow Mein: What's the Difference?

If you’re unsure how to tell these two common Chinese-American dishes apart, you’re not alone. Here’s a quick breakdown of the differences between the two:

 

Chop Suey:

 

  • Has rice as a base
  • Thick, gravy-like sauce
  • Also features veggies, meat, and (sometimes) egg

 

Chow Mein:

 

  • Has crispy, stir-fried noodles as a base
  • Uses soy sauce instead of gravy
  • Also features veggies, meat, and (sometimes egg)

Can also be made with steamed noodles. In which case, it is called lo mein

Best Pizza and Italian Restaurants in Dallas

 

Since Dallas doesn’t have a specific pizza style, that means they offer nearly ALL the different types to choose from. Here are some of our favorite pizzerias in Dallas.

 

  • Palio’s Pizza Cafe: a menu that includes 17 speciality, gourmet pizzas that includes fresh vegetables, preservative-free sauces, and roasted meats to delight customers of all dietary restrictions
  • Samee’s Pizza Getti: a spot where they whip up traditional pizzas and inventive Italian entrees like shrimp champagne tostini and Salmon Milan, a dish with sautéed salmon on top of crispy flash-fried spinach topped with creamy lemon dill sauce
  • Buca de Beppo: a popular chain restaurant that delights customers with family-style, traditional Italian food like veal parmigiana, baked ziti, and classic Italian-American staples like ravioli and lasagna

A Guide to Different Types of Pizza

 

You might be familiar with New York– and Chicago–style pizzas, but how much do you know about the styles of pizza popular in other cities? Here’s a brief primer on four other pizza styles that might be new to you:

 

New Haven: Known for their irregular shape, New Haven pies are also famous for their charred crust, courtesy of the coal-fired ovens they’re baked in.

 

Detroit: These square pizzas boast an extra-thick crust that stays crispy on the outside, but chewy on the inside. That’s thanks to the well-oiled, steel pans they’re baked in (rumor has it the pans were once used in the auto industry).

 

St. Louis: St. Louis pizza has a love-it or hate-it reputation thanks to its signature ingredient: Provel cheese, a processed mashup of provolone, Swiss, and white cheddar.


Quad Cities: You’ll recognize a Quad City pizza by the shape of its slices—they’re long, rectangular strips, instead of squares or pie-wedges. The dough is also a bit different, made with brewer’s malt, adding a nutty, slightly-sweet flavor that complements a spicy cayenne-laced sauce.

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Chop Suey Vs. Chow Mein: What's the Difference?

Andy Seifert

In the debate to determine the winner of chop suey vs. chow mein, we figure it's important to tell you the difference between chow mein and chop suey.

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