$39 for a Two-Person Sushi or Sashimi Dinner with Appetizer and Beer or Wine at Ido Sushi (Up to $91 Value)

Ido Sushi

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In a Nutshell

Nightly live music such as opera & jazz frames elegant sushi & sashimi dinner for two in restaurant featured in New York Times

The Fine Print

Expires Mar 16th, 2012. Limit 1 per person. Limit 1 per table. Not valid until 11/15/11. Dine-in only. Alcohol is not discounted more than 50%. Valid only for 1 drink per person. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Sushi's firm, sticky rice enables tightly packed rolls to deliver fresh fish to waiting mouths without the intestinal hazards of styrofoam packing peanuts. Feast freely with today's Groupon: for $39, you get a sushi or sashimi dinner for two at Ido Sushi (up to a $91 total value). The dinner includes:

  • An appetizer (up to a $15 value)
  • A sushi, sashimi, or combination dinner for two (up to a $58 value)
  • Beer or wine for two (up to an $18 value)

Head chef Tora Yi at Ido Sushi, which was featured in the New York Times, cultivates a menu of elegant dishes amid an atmosphere infused with live music every night of the week. Wednesdays and Saturdays usher in opera performances, as arias float over appetizers such as edamame, spinach bathed in sesame sauce, or gyoza. Diners can revel in the cozy atmosphere while sharing fork-holding techniques and succulent mounds of sushi—such as Lindsay's roll, which is loaded with crisp, spicy yellowtail cradled by eel, or Dell's roll, a trio of soft-shell crab, spicy tuna, and masago—sashimi, or both, which welcomes an assortment of fresh fish to steamroll over taste buds paved in a choice of soup or salad. Drinks such as Sapporo, Kirin, or house wine wash down exotic flavors, preparing mouths for nights spent trilling along with jazz, rock, and spoons groups.

Ido Sushi

Ido Sushi owner and chef Tora Yi marries edible and aural art by pairing inventive sushi and sashimi dishes alongside live piano and opera performances, building an atmosphere that the New York Times described as “Cheers – dunked in the melting pot.” Like Genghis Khan’s personal Mongolian barbecue, the dining area is ornamented with wall-mounted swords that gleam under soft lighting. Sushi chefs carve fresh salmon, tuna, and vegetables before rolling them on planks behind an open-air bar. Between bites and sing-along sessions, bartenders sling sake, draft beers, and mixed drinks.

Uncomplicated dining experiences that won’t waste your time or budget
Great gifts for every occasion