Berkeley Symphony Presents: MYSTICAL

Zellerbach Hall

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In a Nutshell

Berkeley Symphony examines the art of transformation in a program whose many surprises include brass instruments subbing in for human voices

The Fine Print

Promotional value expires Dec 4, 2015. Limit 8/person. Valid only for option purchased. Reservation required. Redeem on 12/3 for a ticket at venue box office. Refundable only on day of purchase. Must reserve together to sit together. Discount reflects merchant's current ticket prices, which may change. ADA seating cannot be guaranteed. Contact box office prior to purchase for availability. Ticket value includes all fees. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

The Deal

  • $9 for one ticket for balcony seating (up to $20 value)
  • $17 for one ticket for front-orchestra seating (up to $33 value)
  • $29 for one ticket for side-orchestra seating (up to $53 value)
  • $29 for one ticket for side-mezzanine or tier seating (up to $53 value)
  • Click here to view the seating chart

DATE & TIME: December 3, 2015, 8PM
* 6:30 pm – Box Office/Will Call and Cafe Zellerbach open
* 7:00 pm – Pre-concert talk in the main hall (free to all ticket holders)
* 8:00 pm – Concert begins

The Program

The Berkley Symphony moves nimbly through three pieces that transform the familiar into the unexpected. The centerpiece is a U.S. premiere from Sofia Gubaidulina that features soloist Geir Draugsvolla on the bayan (Russian accordion).

  • Gabrieli—Canzon septimi et octavi toni: The great composers of Venice gave birth to the polyphonic choral style of writing. This piece continues that tradition,with brass instruments subbing in for human voices.
  • Gubaidulina—Fachwerk: In Gramaphone’s review of this bayan-centric piece, critic John Warrack praises Gubaidulina’s “fine ear and her skill with subtly arranged and contrasted forms.”
  • Mussorgsky/Ravel—Pictures at an Exhibition: Meant to evoke a journey through an art museum filled with pieces bold and disturbing, Mussorgsky’s iconic piano composition was reinvented when Ravel transcribed it for the orchestra. Throughout the 10 movements, listeners may feel the same ecstasy that Mussorgsky did when composing it: “Ideas, melodies, come to me of their own accord. Like roast pigeons in the story, I gorge and gorge and over-eat myself. I can hardly manage to put it all down on paper fast enough.”

Berkeley Symphony

  • 1969: British maestro Adrian Boult's protégé Thomas Rarick debuts the Berkeley Promenade Orchestra—which, in true '60s spirit, performs wearing casual clothes in unconventional settings while being conducted entirely by good vibes.
  • 1978: Kent Nagano takes the reins as music director, heralding such changes as programming focusing on rarely heard 20th-century scores, a switch to formal attire, and a name change.
  • 1984: The orchestra joins forces with Frank Zappa for a critically acclaimed concert featuring elaborate stage sets and life-size puppets.
  • 2003: The orchestra gets a comfortable pullout sofa and therefore its first composer-in-residence: Naomi Sekiya, whose Sinfonia delle Ombre for two guitars and orchestra debuts later that year.
  • 2009: Joana Carneiro becomes the third music director in the orchestra's 40-year history, forging relationships with prominent Bay Area composers such as John Adams, Gabriela Lena Frank, and Paul Dresher.

Merchant Location Map
  1. 1

    Zellerbach Hall

    101 Zellerbach Hall

    Ste. 4800

    Berkeley, CA 94720

    +15108412800x1

    Get Directions

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