Pilates in Massachusetts

Select Local Merchants

  • Boston Body Pilates
    It was the early 1980s, and after devoting about a decade of her life to fitness, Zayna Gold felt like her body was beaten up. Over time, she began noticing that her high-intensity gym workouts were hurting her body as much as—if not more than—they were helping it. Her husband, Clark, was having the same problem. An avid weightlifter and runner, he found the physical wear and tear was starting to prevent him from maintaining his physique. Zayna recalled teaching Pilates early on in her career, and how it worked her entire body with low-impact movements. She returned to the lengthening and strengthening classes, and by 1989, she and Clark founded Boston Body Pilates. Their mat, equipment, and barre classes each call upon low-impact stretches and resistance moves that strengthen the core, elongate muscles, and promote overall muscle tone. Zayna's signature program, Brand New Body, challenges students to complete 30 Pilates or barre classes over 2–3 months; and upon completion, they may notice significant changes to their figure. The schedule also includes spinning classes, in diverse variations such as Zen Spin and Spin Bootcamp. In any class, Zayna and her large team of instructors inspire their students to establish a mind-body connection, helping them to feel both physically and mentally stronger, much like solving a crossword puzzle carved in stone.
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    8 Newbury St.
    Boston, MA US
  • Open Doors Yoga Studios
    Owner Richard Lanza began Open Doors as a metaphysical healing center and store in 1992, and he carried that healing spirit into the yoga studio he opened in 2003. At Open Doors Yoga Studios, Richard's goal is to create a space where people feel empowered to explore their personal beliefs on a path toward self-healing. Thus, yoga instructors at the studio's numerous locations help practitioners achieve their personal goals through accessible classes, each designed to build core strength while quieting the mind and increasing body awareness. From slow-flow heated classes to unheated Hatha sessions, students can participate in a variety of yoga styles geared toward beginners, more experienced participants, and those who only feel comfortable in a 98-degree room.
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    960 William T Morrissey Blvd.
    Boston, MA US
  • The Cardio Corner
    The Cardio Corner's nine certified instructors propel exercisers toward fitness goals during classes teeming with kickboxing moves and other dynamic methods of sculpting the physique. During cycling classes, they help up to 12 stationary riders envision the towering hills, freeing descents, and detours through enemies' flower gardens that are fundamental to an outdoor bicycle ride. Filled with deep breaths and slow, graceful poses, all-levels yoga classes provide a calming alternative to cardio classes' vigorous tempos.
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    173 Grove St.
    Worcester, MA US
  • Karoun Yoga
    The pressure was starting to get to Karoun Charkoudian, much like a teakettle when an entire family stares at it impatiently. She had completed grad school and was looking for a corporate gig, and this new phase in life was causing her a lot of confusion. But all of that went away when a friend brought her to a Bikram yoga class in 2003. There, she discovered newfound peace and clarity. In the years that followed, Karoun completed teacher training for several types of yoga, including Vinyasa flow and Iyengar, and became heavily influenced by the meditative movements of Chinese qi gong. Now she shares her expertise within the bright green walls at Karoun Yoga. The intimate, modern studio is also home to other experienced instructors who approach yoga from the realms of fitness, rehabilitation, dance, and spirituality.
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    11 Pearl St
    Springfield, MA US
  • Kundalini Yoga Boston
    Find a workout that works for you at Cambridge's Kundalini Yoga Boston. Check out this gym's restaurant, where you can stay for lunch or grab your meal to go. You may want to pack a change of clothes before heading to Kundalini Yoga Boston, where students rave about the hot yoga classes. Brush up on your parallel parking skills — the gym's Hampshire St location offers nearby street parking.
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    186 Hampshire St
    Cambridge, MA US
  • ClubFit Fitness Center
    Exercise can be a little tough when you start out. Take inspiration during your next workout by understanding the good it’s doing inside with Groupon’s whirlwind tour of the cardiovascular system. The Cardiovascular System: How Exercise Makes it Hum The average person’s heart beats 100,000 times a day, pushing 10 pints of blood all the way to the tips of the toes and back through 60,000 miles of vessels. Along this route, that blood stops to do a great many errands. The heart pumps blood to the lungs to collect oxygen before sending it through the rest of the body via arteries, arterioles, and capillaries. Once the tissues have absorbed the oxygen and nutrients they need, they send the waste-filled blood back to the heart through the veins to be reoxygenated and start the process again. Every time our heart beats, what we really feel is the opening and closing of valves that push the blood through the heart’s four chambers and out to the body. When we exercise or get scared by a shrub that looked like a huge dog for a second, our brains instruct the heart to beat harder to supply the body with what it needs to fight or run. As exercise enhances the muscles over time, it also improves the function of the entire cardiovascular system. This happens in several ways. Although exercise makes the heart work harder in the short term, this ultimately causes the body to adapt, easing the heart’s everyday tasks. In response to muscles’ demand for more oxygen and compliments, the body actually sprouts new capillaries, while prompting existing capillaries to open wider. These increased channels help lower blood pressure, since blood now encounters less resistance on its way to the extremities. The heart also becomes better at oxygenating the tissues—red blood cells increase their numbers during intense exercise. With its insistent knocking in our ribcage, you may think the heart’s role in all this would be hard to ignore. But the earliest anatomists didn’t hear its call so clearly. Galen and Hippocrates believed the liver produced blood and spread it through the body in a centrifugal manner; meanwhile, the veins contained air, which the lungs pushed to the tissues. They also assumed this was an open-ended system, with the blood and air gradually dissipating when it reached the ends of veins and arteries—a view that would hold for another 1,500 years.
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    200 N Dartmouth Mall
    North Dartmouth, MA US

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