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Museums in Tenderloin, San Francisco


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  • Forrest Perkins
    You'll love opening your mind with a trip to this cultural site. Forrest Perkins San Francisco will expand your perspective brilliantly in San Francisco. Parking is plentiful, so patrons can feel free to bring their vehicles.
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    450 Geary Street
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Spoke Art
    In Focus: Spoke Art Gallery What it is: an art space that showcases new contemporary paintings, sculptures, and illustrations, and sells limited-edition pieces at affordable prices It began: as a pop-up exhibition in Oakland’s London square before evolving into a brick and mortar gallery space, which opened in 2011 On display: rotating monthly exhibits featuring a variety of solo and group shows, from international works to Wes Anderson- and Quentin Tarantino-themed exhibits Best way to stay in the loop: follow Spoke Art on their (very active) social media pages, or sign up for their mailing list to receive information about shows and print releases Additional space: Spoke Art has a second gallery space two doors down at 804 Sutter Street, as well as a full-scale fine-art print production studio in Oakland
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    816 Sutter Street
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Sf Camerawork
    Anyone can learn how to ride a bike. Get one today from Sf Camerawork in San Francisco and brush up your skills. Sharpen your artistic eye with a little help from this store — even the most impressive artists are dazzled by the stunning pieces on display. Quit making your brain do all of the work to remember all the fun you've had. Get a camera or camcorder to record all of those moments you hold so dearly. Parking-wise, the area has many options for drivers. Sf Camerawork has everything you need to get your pedal on so head over to the shop today and treat yourself.
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    1011 Market St
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Asian Art Museum
    Described as "the largest collection of Asian art in the United States" by Frommer's, the Asian Art Museum helps guests understand the cultural connections between works of art from countries such as China, Turkey, India, and the Philippines. Size: 31 gallery spaces display select items from the museum's 18,000-piece collection of antique and contemporary art and cultural artifacts Eye Catcher: gilded bronze sculpture of a seated Buddha dated back to the Later Zhao Dynasty, making it the oldest known Chinese Buddha sculpture in the world Permanent Mainstay: a ritual vessel in the shape of a rhinoceros represents one of the few surviving artifacts from China's Bronze Age that was created to resemble an entire animal Don't Miss: the new special exhibition Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, which features 200 recently excavated artifacts including stone tools dating back more than a million years From the Press: the San Francisco Chronicle hailed the Asian Art Museum's collection as "the city's greatest cultural asset."
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    200 Larkin St.
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Comedy On Square
    Treat your eyes to some world-class art at San Francisco's Comedy On Square. Be sure to visit the restaurant at this museum for a delicious meal. Having trouble finding that family-friendly activity everyone will love? This museum is made for all ages, so little ones are welcome to come along, too. Parking is plentiful, so visitors can feel free to bring their vehicles.
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    533 Sutter Street
    San Francisco, CA US
  • San Francisco Museum and Historical Society
    On April 18, 1906, the US economy could easily have been destroyed in one of the worst natural disasters in the history of the nation. A massive earthquake and subsequent fires ripped through the streets of San Francisco, leaving devastation in their wake. Though the downtown area and local banks were wiped out, the architect who had designed the Second San Francisco Mint—otherwise known as “The Old Mint” or “The Granite Lady"—knew that the Pacific coast was prone to earthquakes. He built the stately edifice to “float” on its foundations instead of shattering. Thanks to his foresight and the valiant efforts of Treasury Department employees who kept the fire at bay, The Old Mint was virtually unscathed and was the only San Francisco financial institution to stay open. The $200 million worth of gold in its vaults remained unharmed, and the country's economic welfare remained safe. In January 2003, the San Francisco Museum and Historical Society's plan to renovate the unused Old Mint building and create a permanent home for the San Francisco Museum gained approval from the mayor's task force. Today, the society oversees its preservation, renovations, and ongoing activities; visitors can see temporary exhibits against an elegant backdrop of fluted columns, checkered floors, and vintage light fixtures. The society also educates people about Bay Area history through walking tours, monthly programs, and special events including a history expo, holiday tea, special exhibitions, and the Standing Ovations awards gala. It produces two members-only publications: “Panorama,” a quarterly newsletter, and the Argonaut, an original journal that tells the city's stories through items such as photographs, articles, and personal musings.
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    88 Fifth St.
    San Francisco, CA US

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