Sushi in San Francisco


Select Local Merchants

  • Sushi Taka
    Sushi Taka: A User’s Guide Build-Your-Own Maki | Signature Rolls | Creative Catering Build-Your-Own Menu Protein: chicken teriyaki, tuna, or unagi Garnish: avocado, tobiko, kimchi, or marinated jalapeño Sauce: mild miso, chili, or mayo Inside Tip: Though customizable rolls are the top seller, you can also opt for signature selections such as the miso sushi roll with salmon, tuna, fish cake, seaweed salad, and pickled radish. Vocab Lesson Kimchi: a spicy-and-sour mix of fermented veggies such as cabbage, radish, and cucumber that’s popular in Korea Tobiko: flying fish roe; its red-orange color and crunchy texture make it a popular garnish for sushi While You’re in the Neighborhood: After dinner, sip a drink while listening to a live DJ at EZ5 (684 Commerical Street).
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    600 Kearny St
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Ace Wasabi's Rock N Roll Sushi
    Perhaps Frommer’s put it best when describing what sets Ace Wasabi's Rock-N-Roll Sushi apart “from the usual sushi spots around town,” citing “the unique combinations, the varied menu, and the young, hip atmosphere.” Indeed, this restaurant has stood out since 1995 thanks to inventive dishes that feature seasonal fish flown in from Tokyo's Tsukiji Fish Market. The tuna, scallops, crabs, and salmon are paired with accouterments such as maine lobster and Niman Ranch bacon bits. Nearly 40 maki rolls fill up the dinner menu––with options named after famous bands, movies, lingerie shops, and even Elvis¬¬––many of which can be wrapped in organic quinoa instead of sushi rice. No matter the selection, there’s something to complement its flavors on the drink menu, which includes six beers on tap, wines from around the globe, seven signature cocktails, and an extensive list of cold and hot sake. Not surprisingly, posters and album covers from rock-and-roll bands such as U2 and The Pretenders bedeck the walls, which are illuminated by studio lighting. Bottles of sake and candles line display cases, and an open sushi bar gives diners a chance to watch the masters at work.
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    3339 Steiner Street
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Sushi Umi
    Sushi Umi, an upscale sushi restaurant, is known for its fresh sake and innovative rolls. Sushi Umi is more than willing to accommodate families, so kids are welcome to tag along. Need room for one more? Add another to your party — Sushi Umi is great for large groups. Whether you're coming from work or a ballgame, the dress code at laid-back Sushi Umi is come-as-you-are. Call Sushi Umi for catering if you have a big event coming up. Brush up on your parallel parking skills — the sushi spot's Bush St location offers nearby street parking. Prices are downright affordable at Sushi Umi, with most items well under the $15 mark. You can pay with Visa, Mastercard, Discover, American Express or any major credit card.
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    132 Bush St
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Kyoto Sushi
    In Focus: Kyoto Sushi Specialty: Japanese classics such as tempura, katsu, and sushi The biggest draw: Sapporo on draft for $0.99—all day, everyday Best substitute for beer: sake by the glass or bottle Signature roll: unagi and avocado over shrimp tempura Roll most likely to make teens rebel against their parents: the Rock ’n Roll with unagi, avocado, and tobiko
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    1233 Van Ness Ave
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Sushi Time
    Sushi Time: A User’s Guide Stripped-Down Sushi | Tokyo-Style Kitsch | Underground Dining (Literally) Sample Menu To start: tuna avocado tartare with a miso vinaigrette Special roll: Barbie roll—crab, avocado, and salmon, wrapped in thin-sliced lemon Dessert: black-sesame ice cream To drink: a flight of three sakes When to Go: Happy-hour discounts run from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., and you’ll probably have more luck getting a seat right away. While You Wait Try to spot all the vintage kids’ toys whose names have inspired special rolls such as the G.I. Joe and the Hello Kitty. Call dibs on an especially cute sake glass—waiters typically let you pick your own from a charmingly mismatched selection. Inside Tips This spot is also known as “Underground Sushi Time,” and it’s a little hard to spot. Head down the staircase tucked within the mini mall at its address. Reservations aren’t accepted, but if there’s a wait, try heading just upstairs to browse the eclectic selection at Books Inc.—it’s open until 10 p.m. Because of Sushi Time’s small scale, it’s a place for small groups and intimate conversation; parties larger than four may not be able to sit together. Critical Acclaim No. 5 on Business Insider’s list of the 10 Best Restaurants in San Francisco's Castro Neighborhood One of SFist’s 11 Best Sushi Restaurants in San Francisco Vocab Lesson Kenchin-style soup: a soup that incorporates hearty, all-vegan ingredients, including lots of root vegetables, tofu, and shiitake mushrooms. It originates from Japan’s Buddhist temple culture. Tsukune: Japanese chicken meatballs, often cooked on a skewer and covered in a sweet soy-based sauce. While You’re in the Neighborhood Before: Peruse the eclectic wares at A&G Merch, which sells everything from acacia-wood coffee tables to whale-shaped bottle openers (2279 Market Street). After: End the night with a seasonal cocktail and a game of pool at Blackbird (2124 Market Street).
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    2275 Market St
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Akiko's Restaurant
    Akiko’s Restaurant: A User’s Guide Award-Winning Sushi | Omakase Tasting Menu | Seafood Imported from Japan Sample Menu Noodle dish: tempura-chicken udon with onion, carrot, cabbage, and scallions A la Carte Sushi and Sashimi: Maine sea urchin Sushi Roll: volcano roll—spicy salmon, salmon skin, imitation crab, avocado, tempura flakes, scallions, and toasted sesame Nightly Changing Specialty: sustainable blue-fin tuna belly Know Your Ingredients According to The Wall Street Journal, the majority of Akiko’s seafood comes from the Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo. Many of the other items are sourced from local merchants or other Japanese cities. Inside Tips: If you’re a sushi aficionado, go with the omakase tasting menu, for which Chef Ricky Yap prepares up to 15 dishes designed to showcase his culinary creativity. It could include anything from king-salmon sashimi to Japanese abalone cooked sous-vide for six hours, which SF Gate detailed at length. Don’t look for a sign outside—there isn’t one. Instead, look for the huge yellow mural of a fish along the side wall. As owner Ray Lee told The Wall Street Journal, “We took off the sign because of the overwhelming foot traffic.” Due to the restaurant’s popularity and limited seating, it’s best to make a reservation, especially if you plan on visiting during peak dinner hours. Don’t confuse it with Akiko’s Sushi at 542 Mason Street. Though the owners of Akiko’s Restaurant did indeed open that eatery, they sold it more than a decade ago. While You’re in the Neighborhood Before:Stop by for some treats, many of which are imported from the UK, at Fiona’s Sweetshoppe (214 Sutter Street). Just be careful not to spoil your appetite. After:Stop by for a nightcap and a chat with one of the friendly bartenders at Rickhouse (http://www.rickhousebar.com/). If You Can’t Make It, Try This: The sashimi and specialty rolls at Sushi Toni (733 Bush Street), which also stocks a well-curated selection of Japanese saki.
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    431 Bush St
    San Francisco, CA US

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