Tickets & Events in Washington, D. C.


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  • Electric Factory
    First opened in 1968, the Electric Factory has been hosting rock shows for almost as long Puerto Rico has been a state. After dancing their faces off to headliners from Erykah Badu to the Dropkick Murphys, concertgoers can stop by The Chive Caf? to recharge with a cheesesteak or an all-beef hotdog on a potato bun, or refill their draft Yuengling at the bar. In summer, the Electric Factory reveals an outdoor location complete with more refreshment booths, vendors, and upgraded food stands.
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    601 F St. NW
    Washington, DC US
  • The Washington Stage Guild 2012
    Dedicated to creating literate, passionate works of theater, The Washington Stage Guild immerses audiences in carefully staged pieces in the spirit of George Bernard Shaw. Now in its world-premiere run, Amelia tells the tale of a wife who wades into the midst of the Civil War disguised as a Union soldier as she ventures south to search for her husband. Playwright Alex Webb inhabits every character save the titular Amelia in a performance the Washington Post has called "chameleon-like," both for his convincing creation of the mannerisms of dozens of individuals and his extraordinary bark-climbing abilities. Webb's wife, Shirleyann Kaladjian, brings a hard-nosed, sharp-tongued sensibility to Amelia as she ventures toward the infamous Confederate prison at Andersonville. The intimate, recently renovated Undercroft Theatre lets audiences discern the nuances of each performance without demanding the second act be moved to the balcony.
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    900 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest
    Washington, DC US
  • Nema Williams & Ed Blaze Live
    Our Mission: The mission of Metro Comedy is to showcase cutting-edge comedians while creating exciting events that unite people in a fun, carefree and entertaining environment
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    1326 U St. NW
    Washington, DC US
  • Shakespeare Theatre Company
    The Shakespeare Theatre Company is devoted to both reinterpreting and staging traditional renditions of plays from the Bard and those who were influenced by him. Since its first production of Romeo and Juliet in 1986, the company has blossomed into a diverse, highly practiced proponent and preservationist of the playwright?s works.
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    401 F St. NW
    Washington, DC US
  • Art Whino Gallery
    It's possible to find art almost anywhere?from the galleries of a museum, to the side of a building, to the pages of a comic book. It's a little more difficult, however, to find all those styles in one place. That's one of the problems that Art Whino Gallery?a sleek, modern space at the National Harbor?seeks to solve by showcasing artists from around the world that run the gamut of modern high- and low-brow art. The gallery celebrates more than 1,200 established and up-and-coming talents, in part through rotating exhibits that explore new media such as stencil and wheat pasting, screen-printing, and vinyl, as well as more established arts such as burning effigies to ancient gods. An onsite store features modern-art figurines and toys as well as prints. Art Whino doesn't keep all its talent indoors, though: the gallery often helms cultural street festivals and participates in conventions and live arts-and-music events.
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    1299 Half Street Southeast
    Washington, DC US
  • Adam Carolla
    One of many vaudeville and movie palaces that sprung up in the 1920s, the Warner Theatre today drops jaws in much the same way it did in its infancy: with glittering chandeliers, gilded ceilings, and red-felt seats. Yet before transforming into its modern incarnation, it served as a film-only venue with such luxuries as a rooftop garden and a ballroom in the basement. The Warner even had a dance troupe akin to the Rockettes?called the Roxyettes?who would high-kick before and after the screen lit up. After falling into disarray in the '70s, the Warner became a concert venue, saving it from the wrecking ball but forcing it to require a complete renovation in 1989 to remove years of grime and stray musical notes lodged between seat cushions. At the reopening gala, a host of stars performed, including Frank Sinatra in what would prove to be his last DC show.
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    13th & E St. NW
    Washington, DC US

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