$9 for One-Day Admission to Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square (Up to $18 Value)

Kennett Square

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In a Nutshell

  • 1,077 acres of gardens, woodlands & meadows
  • 40 indoor & outdoor gardens
  • Peirce–du Pont house

The Fine Print

Expires Sep 30th, 2011. Limit 1 per visit. Not valid for special events. Merchant is solely responsible to purchasers for the care and quality of the advertised goods and services.

Without gardens, hills alive with the sound of music would spring up everywhere and deafen us with incessant yodeling. Celebrate more peaceful grounds with today’s Groupon: for $9, you get a one-day admission to Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square (up to an $18 value). Tickets for students ages 5–18 or any age with valid student ID are normally $8. Children ages 4 and under get free admission. This Groupon expires September 30.

Longwood Gardens has brought plants and people closer together since 1906, when Pierre S. du Pont bought the Peirce Arboretum to save its trees from lumberjacks. Since then, the gardens, woodland, and meadows have grown to cover more than 1,077 acres with lush green spaces plus 40 indoor and outdoor gardens. Visitors can stroll amid verdant lawns and bend to nostril-kiss each of the more than 11,000 varieties of plants. The walkways curl through one of the largest assortments of garden fountains in the U.S., and the paths into the conservatory guide spectators on a half-mile walk past 20 indoor gardens. To help plan your visit, check out what’s in bloom each season, from the petunias of summer to the chrysanthemums in autumn that are dressed up like Jason from Friday the 13th. General admission to the gardens also includes a visit to the Peirce–du Pont House, a mansion influenced by five periods of construction dating back to 1730.

Longwood Gardens

Though Longwood Gardens owes its current incarnation to the tireless efforts of industrialist, philanthropist, and conservationist Pierre du Pont, the property’s history stretches back to precolonial days. The Peirce family purchased the land from William Penn himself in 1700, and by the end of the century the Quakers had already begun developing an arboretum on the premises. In the century that followed, the homestead was purchased by an ambitious 36-year-old du Pont in 1906. Throughout the next 30 years, du Pont built a legacy rife with extravagant European-style fountains, a picturesque 600-foot garden walk, and 40 indoor and outdoor gardens. Today, visitors experience a bit of du Pont’s passion for the tropical flora of the Americas during jaunts through the property’s 1,077 colorful acres, where they run into everything from flowering trees and delicate hybrids to carnivorous pitcher plants and an 86-acre Meadow Garden. In addition to cultivating lush flora, the garden’s stewards also encourage growing minds with an ever-changing roster of events, such as internationally acclaimed musical acts and immersive educational experiences.