Food & Drink in Lewiston

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Marché pleases midday noshers Monday–Friday with a menu sprinkled with french crêpes, salads, and signature sandwiches. Chef Molly Basile and her staff sate crêpe crusaders with house-made crêpes ($2.50–$15) created using Julia Child's original recipe and stuffed with flavorful fillings such as all-natural Maine lobster, sautéed mushrooms, and fresh Maine blueberries. The chickpea parmesan salad packs a healthy protein punch ($7.50), and the braised short-rib sandwich draws on the powers of house-made cherry-tomato compote, onion straws, and a floured roll to bring peace and tranquility to strife-ridden valleys of taste buds ($9). Rotisserie chicken punches up poultry by filling it with fresh herbs, garlic cloves, and Cabot Creamery butter and spinning it on a rotisserie until it's cooked and ready to rest dizzily next to green beans ($9, call for availability).

40 Lisbon St
Lewiston,
ME
US

The dough wizards at Papa John's hand toss circular masterpieces with original and thin crusts made from high-protein flour to support warm bouquets of toppings. Hand-cut produce crowns all of Papa John's pizzas, mingling with the sun-soaked sweetness of sauce made from fresh, California-grown tomatoes. By adhering to its brand promise of "better ingredients, better pizza," Papa John's grew from a back-tavern pizzeria into more than 3,500 restaurants within three decades' time, or the amount of time it takes to grow a single pizzeria from a small seed.

850 Lisbon St
Lewiston,
ME
US

Maine Today featured She Doesn't Like Guthries. Eight Yelpers give it an average of five stars, and 89% of more than 160 Urbanspooners like it.

115 Middle St
Lewiston,
ME
US

Each autumn, the tree branches at Ricker Hill Orchards begin to bow under the weight of a new generation of McIntosh apples, as they have for more than 200 years. Since 1803, the same family has cultivated the orchards, which today nurture several varieties of apples, pears, and peaches. Along with produce aisles along the East Coast, the fruit fills the baskets at Wallingford’s Fruit House, where shoppers just may save them from another fate: the bakery. There, raspberries, peaches, and blueberries tuck into pies or turnovers and hand-rolled crusts envelop apples to become fresh dumplings. The store also bakes fruitless sweets such as donuts and cookies and bottles fresh cider for pouring over a coach’s head after he wards off all the crows from the field.

In the fall, visitors can explore the orchards and pick apples themselves, hunting down such varieties as Cortland and Red Delicious. Wallingford's Fruit House’s backyard lets youngsters lose themselves in a variety of ways, from the corn maze to the petting-zoo animals’ thought-provoking lectures about delicious grass.

Perkins Rdg
Auburn,
ME
US

Lost Valley Ski Area founder Otto Wallingford was known for creating innovative solutions to everyday problems. Winter came around each year and left him with nothing to do on the family orchard, so he turned the surrounding area into a ski center in 1961. With that problem solved, Wallingford moved on to tackle a few other issues. He put together the state's first snowmaking system, introduced the locals to night skiing, and developed a powder maker by towing a cylindrical steel grate behind his tractor.

Skiers and snowboarders can reap the benefits of Wallingford’s efforts at Lost Valley Ski Area, which encompasses 15 trails and a terrain park. The ski area also hosts lessons and a shop offering gear tuneups and yeti decoys.

200 Lost Valley Rd.
Auburn,
ME
US

Maurice André had always been one for a show. He insisted on wearing stark white gloves to carve Chateaubriand for his regular patrons during the decadent New Year’s Eve feasts he held at his namesake restaurant. The Paris native had always loved hosting parties, and in 1975 he bought a 200-year-old clapboard house with ample space to stock his wine cellar and serve the traditional French fare he had grown up chewing.

Today, the rustic space still resonates with Maurice’s jovial spirit and passion for fine dining–artwork covers the walls and linens cover tables and the occasional face during post-meal rounds of peek-a-boo. Though Corey Sumner–the current chef–exercises his culinary creativity with dishes such as the Cajun-spiced Scallops New Orleans, he pays homage to Maurice’s vision with plates of authentically prepared duck and fish.

109 Main St
South Paris,
ME
US